Investing in Teachers Leads to Student Success

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), March 30, 2015 | Go to article overview

Investing in Teachers Leads to Student Success


Byline: Iton Udosenata For The Register-Guard

In his March 21 guest viewpoint, Dr. Ramin Farahmandpur wrote that teacher effectiveness initiatives distract from the real problems in Oregon's education system. Farahmandpur stated that large class sizes, a shortage of resources, and outside social factors beyond the public school system's control were the real educational issues.

These are all valid and legitimate challenges that contribute to the Oregon school system's low rating, as noted in the annual Education Week report. Overcoming these challenges begins with investing in high-quality instructional models. Dismissing educator effectiveness initiatives may add to the problem rather than solving it.

Addressing the aforementioned concerns is vital to student success. Research, however, continues to suggest that among school-related factors, teachers have two to three times the impact of any other school factor on student performance. Placing the best educators in front of our students is a sound practice that leads to good results. We can't, however, serve our students without investing in ongoing professional development to ensure that current teachers are instructing at a high level.

As a building principal in a district that has partnered with the Chalkboard Project and is in its fourth year of the Creative Leadership Achieves Student Success, or CLASS, project, I can testify to the effectiveness of the program.

Cottage Grove High School is a rural district with 67 percent of students qualifying for free and reduced-price lunch, high multigenerational poverty and a growing English language learner population. Despite these factors (which are perceived to be barriers to success), our school achieved high marks on recent state report cards (level 5 in 2012-13, and level 4 in 2013-14) and boasts an 89 percent graduation rate (17 percent higher than the state average, which is 72 percent). Our educator effectiveness program through CLASS is a driving factor for our district's success.

Past educator effectiveness models were heavily directed by the school administration. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Investing in Teachers Leads to Student Success
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.