Protecting Rights of Journalists

Cape Times (South Africa), March 31, 2015 | Go to article overview

Protecting Rights of Journalists


Journalist Rafael Marques de Morais wrote a book, and for that he could go to jail. His book, published in Portugal in 2011, alleges serious human rights violations committed by army generals and companies in diamond fields in Angola.

Those army generals and companies are taking him to court in Angola for criminal defamation, punishable under current Angolan law by both a prison term and a monetary penalty.

Marques has a long history of holding the Angolan government to account for human rights abuses and corruption through his insightful, thoughtful and well regarded journalistic investigations.

Marques is the recipient of numerous prestigious international awards for his work. He is an equal opportunity human rights defender, working to expose violations no matter who is the accused or accuser.

For his effort, he has been arrested and detained multiple times in Angola.

The UN Human Rights Committee determined his prior conviction for defamation violated his rights to liberty and security of the person, freedom of movement and freedom of expression.

The book for which he is on trial, Blood Diamonds: Corruption and Torture in Angola, asserts damning accusations of egregious human rights violations committed against people residing in the Lundas region in the course of diamond excavations, including death, torture and forced evictions.

The military officials and diamond mining companies and private security contractors implicated first attempted to sue Marques for defamation in Portugal, but the case was dismissed. They then shifted venue and pursued legal action against Marques at home.

There have already been irregularities in the legal process of Marques' case, including questioning without his legal counsel present, improper notice and summons, and the fundamental contradiction of the apparent intent of the government to call him as a witness, resulting in his serving as both defendant and state witness in his own trial.

The below signatory organisations and individuals are concerned about Marques' ability to receive a fair trial as well as the repeated efforts by the Angolan government to stifle his freedom of expression as well as that of other journalists and citizens in the country.

Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, The Media Legal Defence Initiative, the Southern Africa Litigation Centre, the Committee to Protect Journalists, Reporters Without Borders, Freedom House and many others have expressed concerns of documented deaths, disappearances, intimidation and violence toward journalists and citizens exercising their freedom of expression.

We urge the Angolan legal system to recognise the December 2014 decision by the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights in a defamation case against a fellow journalist from Burkina Faso that prison sentences as penalties for defamation violate the African Charter on Human and People's Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

The criminal defamation law under which he is being tried should be found in violation of the Angolan constitution and Angola's obligations under international law. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Protecting Rights of Journalists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.