Kelly, Jerry. the Art of the Book in the Twentieth Century: A Study of Eleven Influential Book Designers from 1900 to 2000

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Kelly, Jerry. the Art of the Book in the Twentieth Century: A Study of Eleven Influential Book Designers from 1900 to 2000


Kelly, Jerry. The Art of the Book in the Twentieth Century: A Study of Eleven Influential Book Designers from 1900 to 2000. Rochester, N.Y.: RIT Cary Graphic Arts Press, 2011. ISBN 978-1-933360-46-1. xviii, 180 pages.

In The Art of the Book in the Twentieth Century: A Study of Eleven Influential Book Designers from 1900 to 2000, Jerry Kelly has created a marvelous distillation of the book and type design innovations of the twentieth century. With succinct summaries of the careers of Daniel Berkeley Updike, Bruce Rogers, Joseph Blumenthal, Stanley Morison, Francis Meynell, Giovanni Mardersteig, Jan van Krimpen, Jan Tschichold, Max Caflisch, Gotthard de Beauclair, and Hermann Zapf, the book charts the progress of the history of the book in our era. Frederic Goudy's claim that the "old boys" had taken full (and perhaps by implication unfair) advantage of their early entry into the world of book and type design is quite defensible, but the designers that Kelly discusses clearly made weighty contributions to the field in our belated twentieth century. While it is certainly true that much has been written about each of the figures discussed in the volume, having Jerry Kelly's insightful and linked perspective on these key figures makes this volume a valuable resource. Moreover, the inclusion of full-page samples of the work of these designers serves to reinforce Kelly's arguments and, of course, contributes substantially to the elegance of the volume. …

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