Dance and Flamenco, a Guide to Sources

By Moon, Carol Ann | Reference & User Services Quarterly, Spring 2015 | Go to article overview

Dance and Flamenco, a Guide to Sources


Moon, Carol Ann, Reference & User Services Quarterly


According to Merriam Webster's Concise Encyclopedia, dance is a "form of expression that uses bodily movements that are rhythmic, patterned (or sometimes improvised), and usually accompanied by music. One of the oldest art forms, dance is found in every culture and is performed for purposes ranging from the ceremonial, liturgical, and magical to the theatrical, social, and simply aesthetic." Print dance resources abound in libraries but tend to be out-of-date and general in nature, unless the library is a part of a research institution with dance research as its main mission.

The general nature of dance resources collecting may be to the detriment of providing the patron with deep information about specific dances. For example, flamenco, a complex set of dances and improvisations, originally associated with the Andalusian Gypsies of Southern Spain but now enjoys worldwide appeal and practice, is a specific dance collection development category that often can be missed. This guide, while starting with some information about general dance reference resources that this librarian has found helpful and essential, aims to supply the reader with annotations to books, e-books, web resources, DVDs, and periodicals specifically about flamenco baile, in order to support the collections manager, who may be focusing on the further internationalizing her collection, as well as helping to shed light on the migration and evolution of flamenco dance throughout the world.

DANCE

Web Resources

Websites were located using a Google search of the term dance. Thank you to Jacalyn Bryan for her New York Public Library website recommendation for this Dance Web Resources section and for her Dance Education Literature and Research descriptive index suggestion for the Dance Databases section.

Congress on Research in Dance (www.cordance.org).

The Congress on Research in Dance (CORD) website supports dance professionals in sharing ideas with one another and with the world through its publications and conferences. CORD publishes the Dance Research Journal (DRJ) three times a year, and the CORD website provides links to JSTOR and Project MUSE databases that index DRJ's articles.

Dance Magazine (www.dancemagazine.com).

This site is the interactive, electronic companion to the print subscription Dance Magazine and now to iPad subscription version. Some of the subscription articles are available for free on the site, as well as some digital-only content, including blogs, videos, back issues, and more. Although Dance Magazine's articles are not peer-reviewed, the magazine, in general, is widely read and has been on the scene since 1927.

New York Public Library, Jerome Robbins Dance Division (www.nypl.org/about/divisions/jerome-robbins-dance-division).

The Jerome Robbins Dance Division website is the Internet face of a unique public institution, which began in 1944. The website describes the major collections available through the New York Public Library, including the Gregory Hines Collection of American Tap Dance, the Doris Humphrey Collection, the American Ballet Theatre Archives, just to name a few. The website helps researchers connect with the collections and services with its Avenues of Access page.

Books and Reference Sources

Books and reference sources were found by searching the library catalog and libraries worldwide, both OCLC systems utilizing WorldCat interface. In addition, a Google search was used. Terms that were used were dance and world dance, limited to books and e-books.

Benbow-Pfalzgraf, Taryn and Glynis Benbow-Niemier. International Dictionary of Modern Dance. Detroit: St. James, 1998 (ISBN: 9781558623590).

There are over four hundred entries on a wide array of modern dance topics, including a chronology that begins with the nineteenth century and Francoise Delsarte and concludes with the death of Bessie Schoenberg in the late twentieth century. …

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