ROM ReCollects: A Sampler

By Matthews, Julia | ROM Magazine, Spring 2014 | Go to article overview

ROM ReCollects: A Sampler


Matthews, Julia, ROM Magazine


With this special Centennial project, we are collecting our visitors' favourite memories of the Museum. Visit the ROM website to enjoy the hundreds of submissions that have already come in ... and to contribute your own!

COMPILED BY JULIA MATTHEWS

My friend, artist and teacher Margaret Ann Fecteau, told me this story. It took place, I think, in the late 1970s. The ROM had at that time a gallery on the archaeological periods of Ontario before European contact. Among the dioramas was one depicting the Palaeo-Indian period that followed the retreat of the glaciers. It featured a life-like body of a woolly mammoth about to be butchered by native hunters. Margaret Ann was sitting and sketching at one end of the gallery when she noticed a very distressed small girl standing in front of the mammoth diorama. She was crying inconsolably. The child's mother hurried over to see what was wrong. "Mommy!" the little girl wailed. "they've killed Mr. Snuffleupagus!"

--Christine Caroppo, ROM staff

I most notably remember the lion. I don't remember a sign or a label ... I just remember it sitting unceremoniously against a wall with a small sign that said "Do not touch." It wasn't until my 20s that I realized it was one of THE lions from the Ishtar gate. That this lion held biblical fame and was one of many lions and Uruks and dragons that lined the ziggurat of Nebuchadnezzar II. No, to me he was a lone animal without other company, and of mysterious origins. …

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