In Memoriam


* Donald Saddler, a Broadway dancer and choreographer, died at the Lillian Booth Actors Home in New Jersey on Nov. 4. He was 96. Saddler was an original member of the American Ballet Theater, and his Broadway credits included Leonard Bernstein's Wonderful Town in 1953 (earning him a Tony for choreography), the 1971 hit revival of the No, No, Nanette (for which he won his second Tony) and the 2001 revival of Stephen Sondheim's Follies.

* Gregory T. Row e, managing director of People's Light & Theatre of Malvern, Pa., from 1983 to 1997, died on Oct. 3. He was 63. One of the many projects with Rowe's fingerprints on it was the Cultural Data Project, an online fiscal-management tool that Rowe worked on from its inception in 2001 through 2011. The CDP is now used by thousands of cultural organizations and more than 100 funders throughout the country.

* Broadway critic Jerry Tallmer died at the age of 93 on Nov. 10. Tallmer established the Obie awards during his time at the Village Voice in the late 1950s, and also won the 1962 George Jean Nathan Award for theatre criticism. His theatre criticism also appeared in the New York Post, Playbill, The Villager, Gay City News, Newsday, New York Daily News and Backstage.

* Kenneth Washington, director of company development of Minneapolis's Guthrie Theater, succumbed on Nov. 26 to kidney disease. He was 68. Washington was with the Guthrie for 19 years, working as a director, choreographer and mentor. He was instrumental in the creation of the Guthrie's summer training program and its joint BFA program with the University of Minnesota. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

In Memoriam
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.