Fast and Furious Thriller Fodder

Cape Times (South Africa), April 17, 2015 | Go to article overview

Fast and Furious Thriller Fodder


BYLINE: REVIEW: Sue Townsend

Jonathan Kellerman

Headline

DR Jonathan Kellerman is an American psychologist and award-winning author of numerous best-selling suspense novels. His writings on psychology include Savage Spawn, Reflections on Violent Children.

He also conducted research into psychological effects of extreme isolation (plastic bubble units) on children with cancer, and the care of these children and their families. His first published book was a medical text in psychological aspects of childhood cancer in 1980.

One year later came a book for parents, Helping the Fearful Child in 1985. Kellerman's first Alex Delaware novel, When the Bough Breaks, was published to enormous critical and commercial success and became a New York Times best-seller. It was also produced as a television movie and won the Edgar Allan Poe and Anthony Boucher Awards for Best First Novel.

Motive, the 20th Alex Delaware novel, pits psychologist Delaware and his friend, homicide cop Milo Sturgis, against a creepy criminal mind, the kind only Kellerman can bring to chilling life. Even having hundreds of closed cases to his credit can't stop LAPD lieutenant Milo Sturgis from agonising over crimes that don't get solved and the victims for whom justice is not won.

Victims like Kathy Hennepin, a shy young woman strangled and stabbed in her home. A single suspect with a solid alibi frustrates Sturgis and Delaware's expert insight can't help. Five weeks later there is the next murder (there is always a next one). …

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