Nursing Practice and Work Environment: Tobacco Use: Trends, Intervention, and Advocacy

By Carpenter, Holly | American Nurse Today, March 2015 | Go to article overview

Nursing Practice and Work Environment: Tobacco Use: Trends, Intervention, and Advocacy


Carpenter, Holly, American Nurse Today


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 18% of Americans smoke cigarettes and more than half of these smokers want to quit. Further, CDC reports that tobacco use is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths in the United States annually. The negative health effects of cigarette smoking are well recognized--multiple cancers, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and others.

Secondhand cigarette smoke (smoke exhaled from a smoker or emitted from the burning end of a cigarette) is estimated to cause 42,000 deaths of nonsmokers annually, according to the American Cancer Society. It is known to cause cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, and sudden infant death syndrome and to aggravate or trigger childhood asthma attacks.

Thirdhand smoke refers to lingering tobacco residue from tobacco smoke. It is found in curtains, carpets, walls, furniture, and other items where smokers have been. Current research links negative health effects to involuntary tobacco exposure.

Tobacco use comes in many forms--not only in cigarettes, chewing tobacco, and cigars but in nontraditional tobacco products, such as electronic cigarettes ("vapes"), hookahs (water pipes), and dissolvable nicotine (tablets or strips). The marketing, manufacture, and distribution of some traditional tobacco products are subject to regulation by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Unfortunately, the environmental impacts and individual and population health effects of nontraditional tobacco products are not subject to the same level of scrutiny. Research is needed to better understand the health risks related to these products to ensure that the public is protected.

What can nurses do?

RNs can assist patients in tobacco cessation. The U.S Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality recommends the "Five A's":

* Ask about tobacco use at every visit.

* Advise the tobacco user to quit in a personalized manner.

* Assess the tobacco user's willingness to quit.

* Assist willing patients to quit through counseling, pharmacotherapy, or other evidence-based modalities.

* Arrange follow-up contact within the first week of the quit date. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Nursing Practice and Work Environment: Tobacco Use: Trends, Intervention, and Advocacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.