The Hard Problem for Soft Brains

By Brooks, Michael | New Statesman (1996), April 10, 2015 | Go to article overview

The Hard Problem for Soft Brains


Brooks, Michael, New Statesman (1996)


Oh, to have been a fly on the wall when the philosopher Daniel Dennett chatted with Tom Stoppard. The conversation took place after a performance of Stoppard's new play about consciousness, The Hard Problem. A few days earlier, Dennett had told an audience at the Royal Institution (RI) that there is no "Hard Problem".

The play's name comes from the label that the Australian cognitive scientist David Chalmers gives to the task of understanding consciousness. This is hard, he says, because no physical phenomena will ever be found to account for the emergence of conscious experience. It is a statement of faith but one that has garnered plenty of support and clearly caught Stoppard's attention.

Consciousness is a tough nut to crack. Scientists aren't sure how to define it and they don't know how it--whatever "it" is--emerges from the squidgy, biological matter of the brain. Somehow, billions of neurons connect and give us the ability to sense the outside world and have what we describe as "feelings" about our experience.

To Stoppard, consciousness is an almost supernatural phenomenon--something beyond the reach of science. His play suggests that those who indulge in spiritual beliefs might be more successful in hunting down the root of consciousness, as if consciousness inhabited some realm beyond physics, chemistry and biology.

Dennett, on the other hand, thinks that we may have already solved the problem of consciousness with a coterie of small-scale, rather banal explanations. The non-mysterious ways in which the brain creates our sensory experience might be the only ingredients we need to explain how it is that we are aware of feeling something.

He expands on this possibility in his contribution to a new collection of essays at edge.org that asks the question: "What scientific idea is ready for retirement? …

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