'Prosperity in SA Tied to Our Economic Relations with Africa'

Cape Times (South Africa), May 13, 2015 | Go to article overview

'Prosperity in SA Tied to Our Economic Relations with Africa'


"In the past 12 months, Deputy Minister Masuku and I visited factories, construction sites, energy plants, communities and investment conferences across the country. We spoke to working and unemployed South Africans, local leaders, managers and investors to see the impact of our policies and to identify what more we need to do.

These visits confirmed our deep sense of urgency at the scale of the challenges facing our people. Some of these are:

l Many young people are full of energy but without jobs.

l Broken infrastructure that had not been maintained.

l Investors who faced problems getting their businesses to run properly.

However, we also saw much to celebrate, quiet but solid local efforts to transform lives, South Africans who are making us proud.

I want to share their experiences today.

In the Western Cape, Andries Motseke, a worker whose towel-making factory has expanded and now employs 81 more people than a year ago. Rachmat Thomas, also from the Western Cape, a black South African woman who co-owns a shoe factory that doubled its employment in the past six years and now employs 300 people. In KZN, Bongiwe Gumede, a lab technician whose packaging plant expanded by 17 percent using an IDC loan.

Jiff Van Zyl in Gauteng is an entrepreneur experimenting with new technologies making it more difficult to steal cables from our electricity network. Solomon Masango from Mpumalanga is a black maize and soya farmer who benefited from the agreement government reached with Afgri.

Avril Johnson, from the Western Cape, a worker whose bed-linen factory is expanding jobs, bringing in new machinery, with a loan and competitiveness enhancement grant from government.

Victoria Gumede, 56, now uses the new clinic located just 10 minutes' walk from her home in Kwa Mahleka, KZN. The convenience of a new fully functional clinic virtually at her doorstep has transformed her life - no longer is she a prisoner of her bed.

Francois Kapp is an engineer who works for the Square Kilometre Array site located in Carnarvon, where South Africa is building the most advanced radio-telescope system in the world.

I met community members and foreign investors in Pofadder in the Northern Cape to launch an R8 billion solar plant that will produce enough electricity for at least 80 000 households or 400 000 consumers, one of 39 completed renewable energy plants.

These stories of South Africans working are confirmed by the statistics collected nationally.

In my budget vote speech in July last year, I noted there were 15.1 million employed people in SA at the end of March 2014.

By December 2014 that figure was 15.3 million, or more than a quarter-of-a-million additional jobs over the nine-month period.

However, the rate of growth, investment and job-creation remain well below what is required and we are confronted by weaknesses in global growth and domestic factors such as energy constraints and industrial relations conflict.

The economy grew by 1.5 percent and the GDP is now more than R3.8 trillion. Public investment in the economy grew to R280 billion last year, although private investment remains weak.

I want to highlight a few examples of what we have done and what we plan to do, and then say something about how our growth and successes are inextricably linked to our relationship with other countries with whom we share this, our continent, Africa.

Over the five years to 2014, the IDC dramatically increased its level of industrial funding by almost 80 percent to R59bn. To boost overall investment further, the IDC has earmarked R100bn in the next five years for investment in the key jobs drivers and we expect R200bn of co-funding by IDC partners, bringing potentially R300bn to the economy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Prosperity in SA Tied to Our Economic Relations with Africa'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.