Website Explores Scott Walker Attack on Wiccan Prison Chaplain

Church & State, May 2015 | Go to article overview

Website Explores Scott Walker Attack on Wiccan Prison Chaplain


Now that he is a potential GOP presidential candidate, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker tends to shy away from "culture war" issues. But more than a decade ago, Walker was involved in an incident that seemed like a religiously motivated modern-day witch hunt.

ThinkProgress's Josh Israel recently detailed the story of Walker's crusade against the Rev. Jamyi Witch, a Wiccan priestess who was hired as a full-time chaplain at the Waupun Correctional Institution, a maximum-security facility. Late in 2001, Walker, who was then a state assemblyman, questioned why a Wiccan was hired at Waupun.

"Witch's hiring raises both personal and political concerns," Walker said in a December 2001 statement. "Not only does she practice a different religion than most of the inmates --she practices a religion that actually offends people of many other faiths, including Christians, Muslims and Jews."

The press release added that Walker, who offered no evidence that Wicca is offensive, "remains open to the idea of eliminating funding for" Witch's position.

Witch was hired in November 2001 after she had served several years as a volunteer for the Wisconsin Department of Corrections. At the time, the warden who hired her offered glowing remarks for Witch.

"Jamyi is an outstandingly approachable person, somebody that I wouldn't mind approaching on spiritual matters myself," the warden said.

Ironically, it seems Witch got the job thanks, in part, to Walker. Witch told ThinkProgress that Walker "had been instrumental in finding funding to keep the chaplaincy program going."

Clearly Witch was not the hire Walker had in mind. He investigated the hiring, reiterating that he was opposed to Witch for purely religious reasons.

"I can't imagine that most of the inmates would feel particularly comfortable going to that individual . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Website Explores Scott Walker Attack on Wiccan Prison Chaplain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.