Environmentalism Is Not Just Another Marketing Tool

Cape Times (South Africa), June 4, 2015 | Go to article overview

Environmentalism Is Not Just Another Marketing Tool


BUSINESSMAN and women (OK, businesspersons) who think environmentalism is only a profitable fad are wrong. While it seems benign and even noble, on its fringes it is not. The suffix "ism" signals its political intent, one that is deeply inimical to free markets, property rights, free speech and, of course, profit.

Saying this, arouses disbelief among honest souls who believe environmentalism is about saving endangered species, cleaning up rivers, planting drought resistant plants in their gardens, refusing to eat a burger, being Vegan, driving a Prius and having photovoltaic panels on the roof.

There is much more to environmentalism, and much more to worry about.

Espousing environmentalism are some people with a visceral hatred of modern democratic societies. Their political philosophy is as dangerous as Fascism and its Communist twin.

For them, caring for the environment is a cloak for a revolutionary agenda. Those who follow it want a root and branch change in the way democratic society works. They want less individual freedom not more. They are working towards a world in which everyone follows their orders and accepts their dogma above all else. It is a totalitarian mindset.

Infiltration

Slowly and stealthily, these believers have infiltrated the environmental movement and through it, all levels of the western society that they aim to destroy

This analysis is not a 21st century version of that parody of anti-communism, "seeing Reds under the bed". It is, for example, the view of Professor Rognvaldur Hannesson of the Norwegian School of Economics, a centre for research and study in the fields of economics and business administration.

The professor's latest book, Ecofundamentalism: A Critique of Extreme Environmentalism, lucidly expresses these fears. He is no global warming sceptic, but an environmentalist. He does not quarrel with the necessity of protecting the environment. He makes no case for more fishing rather than less. But he is concerned about the hijacking of the environmental movement by revolutionary extremists with a violently leftwing agenda.

The professor rejects attacks on fossil fuels. Cheap and reliable energy he says "is the very basis of modern civilisation; without it our way of life would be changed beyond recognition and we would be set back a long way towards the Middle Ages".

"Those who think fossil energy can be replaced with renewable energy any time soon are deluding themselves and would probably be among those least willing to live with the consequences if we really tried seriously to do so.

".... environmentalism in its more extreme forms has unmistakable attributes of irrationality, just like religion; the difference is that in environmentalism "nature" takes the place of God. Nature knows best, we are told, and we had better not tinker with it.

"It is difficult to find a mindset (Ecofundamentalism) more at odds with the human experience; we have come to where we are by learning the laws of nature and turning them to our own advantage, conquering nature to the extent possible".

This is powerful stuff. But can a minority of fervent believers destroy a civilisation? Well, yes, it can. History demonstrates it and the result was never pleasant. Revolution has never led to peace, freedom, equality, or goodwill.

For an example, Christian believers eroded Roman civilisation. Christian charity then mutated into intolerance and violence. …

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