Message from the Dean

By Malhios, Allan | Human Ecology, Spring 2015 | Go to article overview

Message from the Dean


Malhios, Allan, Human Ecology


As we come together this spring to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Cornell's founding, Human Ecology faculty continue to impress every day at the university and around the world, leading their fields in teaching, research, and cutting-edge scholarship. Appropriately, this issue highlights some of our standout teachers, thinkers, and mentors.

The cover story examines the legacy of Urie Bronfenbrenner '38, one of the 20th century's foremost developmental psychologists and a guiding force for federal Head Start, which turns 50 this year. Despite his international profile, teaching always came first for Bronfenbrenner, who inspired multiple generations of students to chart their own paths. His record as a teacher, scholar, and advocate is captured here in the voices of his students and colleagues.

In "Legendary Courses," you'll discover five of the longest-running courses in the college and hear from the faculty members who make them so memorable. From fashion design to nutrition, these are some of the college's foundational classes, attracting Cornell undergrads from all majors and inspiring students long after they leave campus.

As for newer courses, Denise Green '07, assistant professor of fiber science and apparel design, introduced a class on archival research, documenting Cornell style from 1865 to 2015. The course, detailed inside, culminated in a sesquicentennial exhibit, "150 Years of Cornell Student Fashion," showing the progression of campus trends and their connection to political, cultural, and social movements of the past century and a half. …

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