Bomb Blew off My Legs ..I Was Told I'd Never Be a Dad Again. NOW Look. WAR HERO TELLS HOW HE BEAT LIFE-CHANGING INJURIES; EXCLUSIVE

The People (London, England), July 19, 2015 | Go to article overview

Bomb Blew off My Legs ..I Was Told I'd Never Be a Dad Again. NOW Look. WAR HERO TELLS HOW HE BEAT LIFE-CHANGING INJURIES; EXCLUSIVE


Byline: Lucy Varley

WAR hero Stuart Robinson was told he could never be a dad again after losing boths legs in a bomb blast - but the former RAF corporal has proved doctors wrong.

Against all the odds he has defied horrific injuries and delighted wife Amy is expecting a little girl in September.

Devastated Amy, who also served in the Royal Air Force, rushed to Stuart's side in February 2013 after hearing he was in a coma and unlikely to survive.

An improvised roadside bomb laid by the Taliban in Afghanistan had wrecked the armoured vehicle in which he was travelling, leaving him with appalling injuries.

Amazingly, Stuart, 33, pulled through. But his doctors warned he was unlikely to father another child due to damage to his pelvis.

He recalled: "To find my legs gone was such a devastating shock. But to be told I could never have another child with Amy was truly my lowest moment.

"Doctors believed I would die after the accident. I had proved them wrong then and I was determined to prove them wrong again.

"I told Amy I wanted to try, so we did. I couldn't believe it when she fell pregnant after the first try. My perspective completely changed after that - I vowed I would never let being wounded stop me living my life."

The couple started dating while in the RAF. But they first met while pupils at Morecambe High School, Lancs.

A mutual love of sport led to friendship quickly blossoming and they became close, despite Amy being two years above Stuart at school. At one sports day, Stuart asked Amy, then 15, to be his girlfriend.

She turned him down, regarding her adolescent admirer as too immature.

Dream

At the age of 17, Amy pursued her childhood dream to join the RAF and lost contact with Stuart.

But 11 years later, he messaged her on Facebook to say he had followed in her footsteps and was also in the RAF.

The old school pals agreed to meet for a drink and fell for each other instantly.

Three months later Amy was pregnant and two years later they married at Garstang Methodist Church, with Stuart and their son George wearing matching RAF uniforms.

Amy, 34, said: "At school, I knew Stuart as a sporty kid. We went to the same afterschool sports clubs and he would always choose me to be on his team.

"I remember the sports day when he asked me out. I just didn't see him in a romantic way, he was two years younger than me.

"Back then I never imagined settling down or having a family, so being in a relationship never occurred to me."

"Growing up, I had always wanted to be in the RAF. I have no idea where the passion sprouted from but I knew in my heart it was the career for me.

"When I was 17 I grabbed the chance with both hands and trained as an information and communications technician. Eleven years later, I was in Bahrain and decided to join Facebook."

She added: "It wasn't long before I received a friend request from Stuart. I couldn't believe that he remembered me after so long.

"We immediately got chatting. We began to compare lifestyles, how I was living it up in Bahrain and he was out on patrol in Iraq. The years melted away and it seemed we'd never stopped speaking.

"We decided to meet for a drink as friends upon our return to the UK. I was really excited to see him. I wondered how much he had changed. As soon as we met up, there was no denying that there was a major spark between us. From that moment, we became inseparable."

Risk

"Although we knew we were meant to be, we also knew our jobs weren't without risk.

"We often discussed the possibility of Stuart getting injured. As he still loved sport, we discussed possible injuries to his legs. I'll never forget him saying how heartbroken he'd be if he lost them.

"But we somehow convinced ourselves that would never happen to us - everything was perfect. …

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