Personality, Leadership and Management Styles in the National Correctional Setting

By Lin, Hefang; Lawson, Christopher et al. | Corrections Today, July-August 2015 | Go to article overview

Personality, Leadership and Management Styles in the National Correctional Setting


Lin, Hefang, Lawson, Christopher, Borodach, Brandon, Riley, Comita A., Corrections Today


As the population of female leaders in corrections has increased during the past few decades, it is becoming more and more crucial to understand the differences between male and female leadership characteristics. During fall 2014, the Orange County Corrections Department (OCCD) in Orlando, Fla., launched a national survey in order to identify any key differences between male and female personnel leadership and management qualities.

To clarify, there is no "correct" answer to any of the following inquiries. No personal style itself makes an individual any more qualified of a leader than any other style, nor does any certain leadership or management approach. The aim of OCCD's survey was to simply identify what qualities are currently and frequently found in the U.S. correctional system.

The survey consisted of questions that inquired about the recipient's gender demographic at his or her facility, as well as his or her personality, leadership and management styles. As the survey's purpose was to gain insight on leadership in the workplace, the assessment was only sent to individuals who at least held the position of a captain or the civilian equivalent. The survey was accessible from Oct. 1, 2014, to Nov. 21, 2014. The assessment was sent to moderate- and high-capacity adult detention facilities and state departments of correction nationwide.

Out of the 852 surveys that were distributed, 173 individuals completed the survey (20.31 percent), though not every individual answered each question. Table 1 displays the dispersal of responses by those who provided their gender. Of the 167 responses, the most replies came from the Midwest (34.13 percent), followed by the Southeast (24.55 percent), Northeast (20.96 percent), Southwest (11.98 percent) and Northwest (8.38 percent).

Personality Styles

According to R. Craig Hogan and David W. Champagne's Personal Style Inventory, there are four parallel dimensions that make up an individual's personality. (1) These dimensions consist of introversion and extroversion; intuition and sensing; thinking and feeling; and perceiving and judging. The personality inventory attempts to classify a user by his or her social preference, situational perceptions and decision-making styles and attitudes. Among both genders, 62.05 percent of users identified as introverted, while the remaining 37.95 percent identified as extroverted.

71.52 percent of participants identified as "sensing" leaders, while only 28.48 percent classified themselves as intuitive leaders. While sensing leaders perceive situations from concrete facts, intuitive ones perceive things from general theories. An astonishing 81.33 percent of the population acknowledged themselves as thinkers, where the remaining 18.67 percent defined themselves as feelers. Finally, 58.54 percent of users identified themselves as being perceivers, while 41.46 percent identified as judgers. Perceivers take time gathering facts before making a decision, while judgers typically have a quick, "just do it" decision-making style. Table 2 shows how each gender self-identified in each one of the four dimensional pairings.

Leadership Styles

The succeeding section of the survey dealt with classifying each leader's leadership style. Ken Blanchard and Paul Hersey spell out four distinct types of leadership styles in their theory of situational leadership: directing, coaching, supporting and delegating. (2) Directing focuses on defining clear roles and tasks for employees and following them closely. Coaching is similar to directing in that it defines employee responsibilities, though it allows for more two-way communication between employees and supervisors. Supporting is a style focused on praising employees and recognizing their successes when they show the necessary commitment for success. Delegators are involved in decisions and problem solving, though they trust their employees to complete their tasks with little or no supervision or support. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Personality, Leadership and Management Styles in the National Correctional Setting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.