Sales Management Database

By Van Order, Jeff; Chunko, John A. | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, May 1986 | Go to article overview

Sales Management Database


Van Order, Jeff, Chunko, John A., Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


Sales management database

"Nothing moves until a sale is made!' And so where better to begin our digital delineations than with the sales and marketing department? Ad sales are crucial for the success of most publications. But just how effectively are your sales support efforts being managed? Ideally, your salespeople should perform a minimum of paper work and spend their time selling!

Are you giving your sales team the tools they need to compete for ad space? Frequently updated, comprehensive call reports enable a salesperson to keep track of changing decision makers and appropriate dates to schedule sales calls. Key information about the client and its agency--details gathered over the course of several visits-- should be included on the call reports. "This is especially critical when a brand new salesperson takes over an account or sales territory,' comments the sales manager of a 130,000 circulation outdoor enthusiast magazine. "Bringing sales reps up to speed on established accounts is always a delicate business.'

According to the sales director of a medium-circulation publication, "Easily maintained comp and promotion lists, automatic mailmerge generators, timely reminders for upcoming deadlines, and source lead generating systems should be used to support the sales staff.'

Manual systems are inadequate for maintaining this type of support. Storing and retrieving information on index cards or from sales books is fine for small jobs, but soon becomes unmanageable when the task demands sophisticated data manipulation, or if the number of accounts exceeds 50.

Nor is it enough simply to automate your operations by using a computer. Care must be taken to ensure that the proper system and software are used.

The results are far from satisfactory. Although excellent for complex calculations and analyses, a spread-sheet is not designed to create and update call reports. Nor are word processing programs well suited for list management. Readers would be surprised to learn how many users try to make one piece of software handle all their needs. Implementing an account management system tailored to the specific needs of your sales department requires an expert to design and program one from scratch--or a database management software program with its own simplified programming capabilities.

Enter Ashton-Tate's Dbase III, a heavyweight data management tool. Dbase III allows you to create computerized "filing cabinets,' each capable of storing thousands of records. These files are simple to create, yet flexible enough to allow modifications when your system's needs change and as your expertise grows.

Why Dbase III? Most database management software will provide the same basic functions: information may be conveniently stored and retrieved; files may be indexed on various fields; and custom reports may be printed. We've examined other popular progams --such as Rbase:4000, Knowledge Man, and Foxbase. These software packages offer many of the same features as Dbase III and perform well under simulated publishing office environments. But Dbase III goes beyond the basics by providing the best built-in programming environment we've tested. These programming commands allow the user easily to create systems tailored to their specific needs.

You can find help

Also, and most important, should you need assistance with Dbase III, finding help is no problem--it's the most popular, well-supported database manager available. In our book, good technical support help-lines and access to other experienced users (user groups) makes any software more desirable.

By taking advantage of the Dbase III programming capabilities, you can create systems for managing your sales department--not just computerized "filing cabinets.' Duplicated efforts, typing errors, time wasting repetitive tasks and other problems can be reduced or eliminated using turnkey applications programmed with Dbase III. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sales Management Database
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.