Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture-Based Learning

By Frame, Tracy R.; Cailor, Stephanie M. et al. | American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, May 2015 | Go to article overview

Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture-Based Learning


Frame, Tracy R., Cailor, Stephanie M., Gryka, Rebecca J., Chen, Aleda M., Kiersma, Mary E., Sheppard, Lorin, American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education


INTRODUCTION

Team-based learning (TBL) is increasingly used in higher education because it employs active learning to promote self-directed learning (deep learning) and enhances student adaptability in problem-solving situations. (1,2) Deep learning results in greater retention of the material, likely because students understand and make personal sense of the material, rather than simply memorize and reproduce it. (3) Deep learning is an essential skill for health care professionals as they must retain knowledge and understand and incorporate new evidence as it becomes available. Team-based learning is a useful tool for developing deep-learning skills in a variety of disciplines and educational settings. (4) As a teaching strategy, TBL yields similar results as lecture-based formats on evaluations of short-term learning of application skills. (5)

Team-based learning is beneficial to both course facilitators and students. It improves student performance in both academically weak and academically strong students. (6-8) When TBL is employed, students perform better on examination questions, indicating their increased mastery of course content. (9-11) Using TBL may help students achieve the same or better knowledge scores than using more traditional methods; (12) it also may provide a small-group experience in a large class without needing a large number of faculty members. (13,14) Through use of TBL, faculty members can shift factual content delivery to pre-class preparation, leaving more class time for active learning and integration of new learning with the knowledge gained before class. (15) Faculty members perceive TBL may impact student behaviors, such as being better prepared for class, being more engaged during class, and taking more responsibility for their own learning. (16) Team-based learning also provides greater student-to-instructor engagement than traditional lecture during the learning process. (17)

Michealson et al describes TBL as beginning with guided student readings and assignments completed prior to class. (9,15) Upon arrival in class, students take an individual readiness assessment test (iRAT), which consists of approximately 10 multiple-choice questions covering the preclass work and targets the remembering and understanding levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. (18) After completion of the iRAT, the same quiz is taken by the TBL groups as a team readiness assurance test (tRAT). Discussion or a "mini-lecture" follows, during which muddy points identified by the readiness assessment process can be explained, and more complex issues can also be addressed. Next, TBL groups work on an application exercise, which requires the use of critical-thinking skills to apply the information learned to a complex problem or case scenario. The learning session concludes with discussion and wrap up.

Student perceptions of TBL are often positive as it provides students with a high degree of satisfaction and an engaging environment. (6,19,20) Pharmacy students indicate that TBL improves their professional competencies and abilities, as well as their ability to communicate and think critically. (16) Faculty members believe that, compared to other teaching strategies, TBL can enhance student engagement, preparation, and achievement of course outcomes. (16,18) However, little research compares student preference for TBL vs traditional, lecture-based learning.

Incorporation of TBL into pharmacy education is limited, despite the fact that it fulfills an Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) guideline under Standard 11, which encourages curricular incorporation of active-learning strategies to develop critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. (21) When incorporated, TBL is successful in pharmacy curricula because it provides a high level of student satisfaction. (4,10,18,22-24) It may also be more effective than traditional lectures at engaging students across all domains of Bloom's Taxonomy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture-Based Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.