Hundreds Pay Last Respects to Rock Legend

The Journal (Newcastle, England), July 31, 2015 | Go to article overview

Hundreds Pay Last Respects to Rock Legend


Byline: Michael Brown Reporter m.brown@ncjmedia.co.uk

HUNDREDS of mourners packed a Tyneside church and spilled into the churchyard outside to say their goodbyes to North East rock legend Dave Black.

The guitarist and singer, best known for Goldie's 1978 chart hit Making Up Again, died on July 18 after being hit by a Metro train.

And on Thursday family, friends and fans - including superstars like AC/DC's Brian Johnson - paid their respects to the 62-year-old at St George's Church in Cullercoats.

"Everyone from the biggest rock stars to average acts were there today it shows his ability to cross barriers," said musician, actor and comedian Brendan Healy.

"He was the sort of person that if you saw him in the street you'd walk towards because you wanted to be around him."

Brendan said that but for a lack of opportunity, the Kestrel and 747 founder could have been one of the world's biggest guitar stars.

"He was a consummate professional, worked hard all his life and maintained a standard far above what you'd expect of a local musician.

"He was one of the most talented guitarists I ever saw - and a great singer too."

Members of the 62-year-old's family - mum Patricia, brothers Peter and Michael, sister Vanessa, and daughter Charlotte - thanked friends and fans for their tributes to the father, son and brother.

"It's a difficult time," said Michael, 56, from Whitley Bay.

"My mum is broken-hearted and in bits, but myself and the rest of the family are very, very comforted by the tributes, which have been fantastic. "A complete stranger came up to me in the street in tears. It makes you realise he was a major part of people's lives.

"We're obviously immensely proud of Dave and the work he did and not just Goldie, as that was just one part of his life.

"Yes it's important to look at Making Up Again but he had a lot of life after 1978. …

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