Now Experts Say Butter May Be Better for You Than Margarine; We Have All Grown Up Believing Butter Is Bad for Our Heart, but New Research Published in the British Medical Journal Has Found That Margarine Could Be Far More Deadly. Here, Health Correspondent Mark Smith Takes a Closer Look at the Study

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 13, 2015 | Go to article overview

Now Experts Say Butter May Be Better for You Than Margarine; We Have All Grown Up Believing Butter Is Bad for Our Heart, but New Research Published in the British Medical Journal Has Found That Margarine Could Be Far More Deadly. Here, Health Correspondent Mark Smith Takes a Closer Look at the Study


Byline: Mark Smith

DIETICIANS have traditionally urged the public to cut down on saturated fats found in butter, eggs or cream to help lower the risk of heart problems.

But a pioneering new study has found that so-called trans-fats found in processed foods like margarine could actually pose a far greater danger to your health.

Saturated fats come mainly from animal products, such as butter, cows' milk, meat, salmon and egg yolks, and some plant products such as chocolate and palm oils.

In contrast trans unsaturated fats, or trans-fats, are mainly produced industrially from plant oils for use in margarine, snack foods and packaged baked goods.

Guidelines currently recommend that saturated fats are limited to less than 10%, and trans-fats to less than 1% of energy, to reduce risk of heart disease and stroke.

But the new research involving more than one million people found there was no evidence that saturated fat was bad for health.

Lead researcher Russell de Souza, an assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University in Canada, said: "For years everyone has been advised to cut out rans-fats have no health band pose a significant risk fodisease, but the case for satufat is less clear.

"That said, we aren't advocing an increase of the allowance for saturated fats in dietary guidelines, as we don'see evidence that higher limits would be specifically beneficial to health."

" The researchers analysed the results of 50 observational studies into links between the two types of fats and aduhealth.

It found no associatiobetween higher saturated consumption and a greater likhood of stroke, heart disease death.

But nor did they find evidence that diets high in saturated fat reduced the heart disease risk.

Trans-fats, by contrast, were associated with a 34% rise in death from any cause, 28% increase in death from coronary heart disease and an overall 21% hike in the risk of developing heart disease.

Cardiovascular disease causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK, while current prevention guidelines advise men should eat no more than 30g of saturated fat a day, while the maximum for women should be 20g.

Prof De Souza added: "If we tell people to eat less saturated or transfats, we need to offer a better choice. "Unfortunately, in our review we were not able to find as much evidence as we would have liked for a best replacement choice, but ours and other studies suggest replacing foods high in these fats, such as highfat or processed meats and doughnuts, with vegetable oils, nuts and whole grains."

Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, said the results of this review support existing guidance to avoid industrially produced trans-fats. …

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Now Experts Say Butter May Be Better for You Than Margarine; We Have All Grown Up Believing Butter Is Bad for Our Heart, but New Research Published in the British Medical Journal Has Found That Margarine Could Be Far More Deadly. Here, Health Correspondent Mark Smith Takes a Closer Look at the Study
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