Our Little Gem Merits Spot in History Books; INSIDE WOMEN'S FOOTBALL

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), August 30, 2015 | Go to article overview

Our Little Gem Merits Spot in History Books; INSIDE WOMEN'S FOOTBALL


Byline: INSIDE WOMEN'S FOOTBALL LAURA MONTGOMERY

I am very fortunate to be one of the 18 jurors who vote for the UEFA Best Women's Player in Europe Award.

On Thursday at the Grimaldi Forum in Monte Carlo, I pressed button three on my electronic device and gave my vote to Celia Sasic, the former FFC Frankfurt and German international striker.

I was one of 11 who chose Sasic as the winner ahead of French midfielder Amandine Henry and German playmaker Dzsenifer Marozsan. For me, it was an easy choice.

'' Sasic finished an incredible season by lifting the Champions League trophy with her Frankfurt team-mates.

Scotland incredibly lucky On top of being leading scorer in that competition, she also came out on top in the Frauen Bundesliga Kim on the as well as the World Cup.

blue Eusebio is the only other player to have finished top goalscorer in the European Cup and World Cup in the same year, which shows just how remarkable and difficult her achievement was.

Two things stand out for me this year, though.

One is that Sasic has now retired. Second is that Scotland's own Kim Little never makes it on to the shortlist to allow me to vote for her.

Sasic turned just 27 years old in June but shocked the world when she announced her retirement a few weeks later.

A player clearly at the very top of her game has decided to call it quits, a decision she says she doesn't regret after an incredible 11 years in the sport.

Married to Croatian football player Marko Sasic, like many women her age she has choices to make about family and other aspects of her life and has decided she cannot continue in her profession as a result. …

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