Cindy Has Missed a Great Photo Opportunity

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), September 5, 2015 | Go to article overview

Cindy Has Missed a Great Photo Opportunity


Byline: Emma Johnson

SO, almost six months after THAT retouched, "un-retouched" photo of Cindy Crawford emerged, the supermodel has finally spoken of her feelings about it.

In case your life is not quite as occupied with following celebs' every movement and muttering, let me fill you in.

Back in February the internet erupted after a TV news reporter posted what she believed to be an un-retouched photo of Cindy taken from an interview the model had done with Mexico's Marie Claire more than a year earlier.

In the photo - which saw the 49-year-old wearing a furry coat flung open to reveal her bra and knickers - Cindy looked somewhat different to how we are used to seeing her in magazines. The flesh was a little looser, the breasts not quite so perky.

Instantly Twitter was awash with comments. The troll collective spat its usual venom but many women rushed to their keyboards to say how heartened they were to see the famous beauty was maybe not so perfect after all.

Conflicted over |Supermodel Cindy One woman who resolutely refused to take part in the debate however was Cindy herself.

Then came the bombshell. The Marie Claire photographer who took the pic issued a statement insisting the photo had been stolen and someone had altered it to make Cindy look bad. The statement was accompanied by a letter threatening anyone who posted it with a lawsuit.

Then it all went quiet. Until now.

In the latest issue of Canadian Elle, Cindy speaks of her conflict over the photo and how she couldn't understand why a bad picture of her would make other women feel good.

She says: "I felt blindsided. I was very conflicted, to be honest. It put me in a tough spot: I couldn't come out against it because I'm rejecting all these people who felt good about it, but I also didn't embrace it because it wasn't real - and even if it were real, I wouldn't have wanted it out there. …

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