Grace, Humility - and a Huge Asset to the Economy; JACQUI MILLER-CHARLTON Says We Have All Been Privileged to Make History in the Queen's Record-Setting Reign

The Journal (Newcastle, England), September 15, 2015 | Go to article overview

Grace, Humility - and a Huge Asset to the Economy; JACQUI MILLER-CHARLTON Says We Have All Been Privileged to Make History in the Queen's Record-Setting Reign


Byline: JACQUI MILLER-CHARLTON

ONG Live our Noble Queen...

LNever has a line been more poignant. Our queen on September 9 became the longest-ever serving monarch in British history and in so doing passed her greatgreat-grandmother Queen Victoria who held the title up until then, having reigned from June 1837 to January 1901, some 63 years, seven months.

In the 100 years since the Victorian era which history recognises for the great changes brought about to all aspects of our cultural, scientific, industrial, financial and military life Victoria ruled the United Kingdom (as well as being empress of India at the height of the British empire) at a time where the monarch enjoyed supreme power and her subjects rarely questioned her or her governments' decisions.

Fast forward to Queen Elizabeth II and the landscape and attitude of her people are the polar opposite. Taking up her reign at the age of 25, after the sudden death of her beloved father in 1952, she has successfully navigated the monarchy through some of its most testing times.

Now at the age of 89 she remains steadfast in her selfless dedication to the duty bestowed on her as next in line to the throne from the moment her father became George VI after being thrust into serving his country by the sudden abdication of his brother, who ruled briefly as Edward VIII.

Elizabeth II has seen out 12 British prime ministers. One previous PM, Labour's Clement Attlee, could not have imagined when he said "it is hoped that Her Majesty live a long and happy life and that her reign may be as glorious as that of her great namesake and predecessor Queen Elizabeth I" that this Elizabeth would go on not only to preside over a period in history where Britain delivered to the world some of its most life changing innovations in the field of science, technology and communications with the discovery of the DNA genetic code, the civil nuclear power discovery, super conductivity, IVF and of the gift of the World Wide Web but that she would also in fact go on to become our great nation's longest ever serving monarch.

It seems incredible that although women have come a long way in terms of gender equality since the time of the Queen's great-greatgrandmother Queen Victoria, equality in some areas is still considered a long way off. Quite ironic really when you consider that most historians would name our three greatest ever monarchs as all being women in Elizabeth I, Victoria and of course our current Queen.

As a woman who has spent my career in a man's world and who is passionate about equality between the genders, the Queen is an inspirational example to me of women 'making a real difference to the world' and for that reason I have the utmost respect for Her Majesty and all her achievements. …

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