Sheriffs: The Key to Local Control: County Sheriffs Backed by Informed Citizens Are a Crucial Barrier to a National Police State

By Wolverton, Joe, II | The New American, September 21, 2015 | Go to article overview

Sheriffs: The Key to Local Control: County Sheriffs Backed by Informed Citizens Are a Crucial Barrier to a National Police State


Wolverton, Joe, II, The New American


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

As one by one the parchment barricades protecting the people from the destructive growth of government are being attacked and overrun, there is one key group of officials who are stepping into the breach--county sheriffs.

On August 6 of this year, a sheriff with an eye on the Constitution and his fellow citizens stood steadfastly against the federal usurpation in defense of one of the residents of his county.

On that day, about 100 residents in Priest River, Idaho, gathered outside the home of a U.S. Navy veteran to protest an effort by the federal government to confiscate the man's guns.

Idaho state representative Heather Scott said that the veteran, John Arnold, received a letter from the Veterans Affairs office "warning him that he cannot possess or purchase firearms."

Remarkably, found among the throng of protesters was Bonner County Sheriff Daryl Wheeler. Wheeler "promised to stand guard against any federal attempts to remove Arnold's guns," the Associated Press reported.

"I took an oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution and uphold the laws of Idaho," Wheeler said, as quoted in the AP story. "This seemed appropriate to show my support. I was going to make sure Mr. Arnold's rights weren't going to be breached."

Earlier this year, the Helena (Montana) Independent Record reported on the effort of the state legislature to protect not only the sovereignty of the state, but the status of sheriff as the highest constitutional law-enforcement authority:

   House Bill 274, the "sheriffs first"
   measure, says federal agents may not
   make an arrest, search or seizure in
   the state without the written permission
   of the sheriff--or risk prosecution
   by the county attorney for kidnapping,
   trespass, theft or homicide.

     "This bill is well intentioned,"
   said sponsor Rep. Nancy Ballance,
   R-Hamilton. "Federal overreach is
   a real concern. Our people want to
   know there is a last line of defense
   when the feds come into their county.
   And that's the sheriff."

Sheriffs nationwide are awakening to the reality of their role as the ultimate constitutionally elected county executive. Once aware of this role and its responsibilities, the lawmen are stepping up in defense of the Constitution.

Elected sheriffs, as the top law-enforcement officers within their counties, work for the citizens and taxpayers in their jurisdictions, not the federal government. This is a critical distinction in the era of rapid federalization (nationalization of local law enforcement).

One group of lawmen in particular has provided inspiration and information to county sheriffs willing to be an impenetrable roadblock on the federal government's path toward absolutism: the Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association (CSPOA).

The CSPOA's two-fold mission is to save America and to get enough people involved in that fight to make the dream a reality. The organization's website describes precisely how they propose to achieve this lofty and laudable goal:

   The answers lie within our grasp and
   come from the foundation of our
   country. The principles are embodied
   within the Declaration of Independence
   and outlined in the Constitution.

   Yes, America is in deep, deep
   trouble. The good news is that there
   is hope and my [CSPOA founder,
   former Arizona Sheriff Richard
   Mack's] victory at the US Supreme
   Court proves that it only takes a few
   to stand to make monumental changes.
   We do not have to stand by and
   watch while America is destroyed
   from within. If our counties, cities,
   and states and all local officers keep
   their oaths to protect us from tyranny,
   we can win this battle to take our
   country back.

   This is our plan, our goal and our
   quest. We are forming the Constitutional
   Peace Officers Association
   which will unite all public servants
   and sheriffs, to keep their word to uphold,
   defend, protect, preserve, and
   obey the Constitution of the United
   States of America. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sheriffs: The Key to Local Control: County Sheriffs Backed by Informed Citizens Are a Crucial Barrier to a National Police State
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.