Frieze Everybody; London Is Packed with Art Ancient and Contemporary, Home-Grown and International, for This Fabulous Fair, Says Corinne Julius

The Evening Standard (London, England), October 14, 2015 | Go to article overview

Frieze Everybody; London Is Packed with Art Ancient and Contemporary, Home-Grown and International, for This Fabulous Fair, Says Corinne Julius


Byline: says Corinne Julius

NOW in its 13th year, Frieze London focuses the eyes of the art world firmly on the capital. Among the leading global contemporary art fairs, Frieze has spawned fringe events and its fair share of brouhaha, while offering Londoners the chance to view top-notch exhibits -- and gain an education.

Frieze London runs from today until Saturday in Regent's Park, while Frieze Masters -- also in the park, but giving a unique view of the relationship between ancient and new art -- runs for an extra day. Frieze Masters will show work made pre-2000, while Frieze London shows mainly post-2000 works.

A wealth of separate exhibitions adding to the London art experience include new openings, such as an MC Escher show at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and from tomorrow, the Alberto Giacometti Pure Presence show at the National Portrait Gallery.

Frieze features more than 164 galleries from 27 countries presenting what they consider their most significant and exciting contemporary artists. You can also buy art, even if your pockets aren't deep. Many of the works, while worth seeing, may be beyond the reach of most Londoners. However, Frieze has introduced a slightly less expensive section called Focus, which gathers younger galleries, offering visitors the chance to buy emerging talent with prices from about PS5,000. These include a floor-based "water relief " by young Londoner Samara Scott of The Sunday Painter gallery in Peckham, and a multifaceted ceramic presentation by another up-and-coming Londoner, Jesse Wine, of Hackney's Limoncello gallery.

The Live section presents performance-based art, such as portrait sittings by Ken Kagami at Tokyo's Misako & Rosen gallery. A free outdoor exhibition in Regent's Park Sculpture Park shows 16 new and historical works, set in the English Gardens. A major installation on display is Lock (1976-7) by Richard Serra of Peter Freeman Inc in New York. Seven of the sculptures will be on view for three months.

In the last three years, Frieze Masters, offering historical art in a contemporary context, has won praise from Londoners and critics. At the Camden Town end of the park, it is a museum of the unexpected, combining Pre-Columbian art with Alexander Calder mobiles, for example, with knowledgeable and passionate experts answering questions. Hauser & Wirth and Moretti Fine Art collaborate to place 14th-century Italian panels alongside Hans Arp and Louise Bourgeois; while Karsten Schubert and Tomasso Brothers Fine Art display Bridget Riley with Old Master drawings and ancient portrait sculpture.

ENCOURAGING COLLECTORS A new feature section, Collections, curated by historian Sir Norman Rosenthal, shows specialisms such as Japanese netsuke (at London's Sydney L Moss gallery) and a 40-piece display of Italian majolica from the 15th to 17th centuries (Bazaart). Several galleries go the whole hog, creating immersive installations such as Richard Feigen and JP Molyneux's intimate room set -- which shows how modern and historical objects and paintings can sit side by side -- and Richard Nagy's recreation of a 1912 Viennese sitting room with Egon Schiele art and furniture by Hoffmann, Czeschka and Wagner.

BEYOND THE FRIEZE In Berkeley Square, PAD London, running until Sunday, is the centre of 20thcentury decorative arts and design with a dash of art. Prices aren't modest, but this fair's worth a visit to see what is setting trends. Gallery FUMI shows a seat from British designer Max Lamb's installation, My Grandfather's Tree, plus Bob Lorimer's Singularity Chandelier. …

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