How to Recruit Government Workers

By Elling, Terry L. | National Defense, July 2015 | Go to article overview

How to Recruit Government Workers


Elling, Terry L., National Defense


* For many government contractors, current and former government employees--including military service members--comprise an experienced and valued source of talent. Government alumni bring to the table knowledge of agency priorities, concerns and requirements.

They also can play a key role in resolving the pressure on both agencies and their contractors to realize greater efficiencies and reduce costs of work performed by contractors. There are a panoply of rules, however, that regulate the hiring of current and former government personnel.

Conflict of interest laws and regulations require a government employee to disclose contacts with potential employers to her supervisor and recuse herself from any agency matters involving the potential employer. These rules restrict and often require the disclosure of any gifts including travel and meals paid for by the prospective employer as part of the interviewing process.

Also, ex-government employees may not "represent" or accept compensation from contractors for one year after being involved, on the government side, in procurement or other actions that affect the contractor.

There are also restrictions on government employees' use and disclosure of nonpublic, government-sensitive information. A host of statutes and regulations prohibit or restrict the release of nonpublic information and impose criminal and administrative liability on unauthorized disclosures of such information acquired during government service.

Violating the law may result in criminal and civil liability for both the former government employee and for the contractor, as well as administrative penalties, including suspension and debarment, and adverse contractual actions such as termination for default, or a finding of ineligibility for future work.

Recruiting current and former government personnel, if undertaken consistent with the rules, however, can be rewarding for both the employee and the contractor. The following is not a comprehensive listing of all of the applicable laws and regulations, but provides a starting point for ensuring a successful and compliant recruiting and retention program, listing some essential "do's" and "don'ts."

First on the "do" list is performing a reasonable level of diligence on candidates who now, or previously, worked with the government. Confirm whether they "personally and substantially" worked in any "particular matter" that may be subject to the lifetime ban on activities on behalf of the contractor.

For personnel who held supervisory positions, check whether any particular matters were pending under their supervision that may be subject to the two-year ban on representational activities. Senior officials--including general officers and members of the senior executive service--will also be subject to a one-year "cooling off' period during which they generally cannot contact their former agency on behalf of any third party.

Employers should ask whether the government employee was involved in any significant procurement action, such as an award or modification of a contract or order, or approving payments or claims, with a value exceeding $10 million, which would trigger a one-year ban on accepting any compensation from the affected contractor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How to Recruit Government Workers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.