Michelle Beadle: The ESPN Host and Twitter Favorite on How She Deals with Online Trolls

By Bazilian, Emma | ADWEEK, October 12, 2015 | Go to article overview

Michelle Beadle: The ESPN Host and Twitter Favorite on How She Deals with Online Trolls


Bazilian, Emma, ADWEEK


What's the first information you consume in the morning? The first thing I do--and this has become normal, I think--is check Twitter. And then I hit my regular list of sports websites, like Terez Owens, The Big Lead, Deadspin, and then I do a little BuzzFeed, a little Huffington Post. I feel like because we're at our computers and on our phones all day, it's just this constant state of input. I always remind myself of Johnny Five from Short Circuit. There's just more and more input every day. It never ends.

Were you an early social media adopter? No, I actually fought it. When I was first at ESPN, I was doing this show with Colin Cowherd, and the producer came to us and said, "Hey, we'd really like it if you joined Twitter." Both of us were like, "No way." So ESPN started to tweet for us, and maybe a week later, I realized, "Well, if my name's on it, I definitely don't want somebody else doing it." It became pretty addictive.

You're quite outspoken on Twitter. Does that ever get you in trouble with your bosses at ESPN or do they encourage it? Honestly, neither. They haven't told me to go for it, but they haven't really held me back either. I think that ESPN has been forced, along with the rest of us, to learn this landscape. And it can be scary--there are definitely a few of us who tend to tweet things before we really think about them.

Being a woman in a male-dominated field like sports can come with a lot of online negativity. How do you deal with that? I mean, I always laugh because I don't know what it's like to not be a woman in sports. I always assume we're getting it equally, but then I realize, maybe we're not. …

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