Former U.S. Ambassador to Address America's Foreign Policy toward Africa

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 23, 2015 | Go to article overview

Former U.S. Ambassador to Address America's Foreign Policy toward Africa


Byline: Phil Brozynski

Ongoing conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria and Yemen, a eurozone still on an economic knife's edge, the Iranian nuclear program and deeply unsettled transitions across the Middle East have not given the United States much time to contemplate Africa.

Although trade between the United States and sub-Saharan Africa has grown over the past decade, it accounts for less than 2 percent of all U.S. goods trade. After reaching its peak in 2010, U.S. democracy assistance to Africa has dropped nearly 20 percent over the past four years, to $257 million in 2013.

What is the United States' policy toward Africa?

Robin Renee Sanders, D.Sc., a former U.S. ambassador to Nigeria, will address that question when she presents "U.S. Policy Toward Africa: What Is It and Why Is It Important?" as part of the Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Public Lecture Series at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, in the Presentation Room of the Krasa Student Center on the campus of Benedictine University in Lisle.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

The Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows program, which is administered by the Council of Independent Colleges in Washington, D.C., brings prominent artists, diplomats, journalists, business leaders and other professionals to campuses across the United States for a weeklong residential program of classes, seminars, workshops, lectures and informal discussions.

Sanders is the former ambassador to the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Republic of the Congo, and former director of the Africa National Security Council at the White House. She currently serves as CEO of FEEEDS Advocacy Initiative, which focuses on food security, education, environment, economic development and self-help projects, particularly in Africa, and also provides business solutions in this area. …

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