AbaThembu Kingdom Supports Student Protests, Deplores Abuse of Power

Cape Times (South Africa), October 29, 2015 | Go to article overview

AbaThembu Kingdom Supports Student Protests, Deplores Abuse of Power


BYLINE: King Buyelekhaya Zwelinbanzi Dalindyebo

I have, as a bona fide child of the African soil, a concerned parent and a student, noted with pain and much disturbance the brutal response by the government of the Republic of South Africa to the peaceful and legitimate protest launched by the students against commercialisation of education in South Africa.

The assault and other forms of physical abuse of students by the police on unarmed young men and women was a clear abuse of power and violation of the constitution of the Republic of South Africa. The protest actions and demonstrations by the students were justified and indeed a legitimate cause.

The Kingdom of AbaThembu, from the inception, supported the "#FeesMustFall" campaign, which saw students of different races, classes, tribes, nations and political affiliations united under a common goal that there should be no fee increment for 2016 in light of the already exaggerated tuition fees for the university entrance.

This Kingdom further joins hands with those demanding free education for all from primary to the highest education level.

The demand for free education is consistent with the objectives which all Kings of this Kingdom, from Ngangelizwe, Dalindyebo, Sabatha (my late father) to the incumbent, joined the liberation struggle and decided to live the beauty of our Kingdom with attendant benefits, and joined the liberation forces. We will never rest until the total liberation of our people is achieved.

We condemn acts of corruption and abuse of power which, in essence, is the cause of these fee increments intended to feed those who are already rich and powerful at the expense of the poor and struggling masses.

The police were aggressive towards students, as they were to the workers in Marikana.

The Kingdom is ashamed that a democratically elected government would resort to violence to resolve legitimate demands of its people.

The television scenes during the student protest action reminded us of the events in 1976 by the apartheid regime against students. Indeed, our country is still not free. We, therefore, call upon all AbaThembu people and other people of South Africa to join the call for free education, the condemnation of police brutality against strike action and the immediate release and withdrawal of cases against students.

On the matter facing this Kingdom, we resolved, as AbaThembu, to report to you at a later stage, but for now, we would like to inform the nation that an appeal has been filed to the Constitutional Court of South Africa, with my bail being extended. The case has always been a subject of political manipulation to undermine the Kingdom and dethrone the incumbent.

This step is calculated to destroy the AbaThembu nation and their self-determination. We will use all the legal processes to protect the integrity and supremacy of the AbaThembu nation. …

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