Folger's Multi-Library Dickinson Exhibit Brings Poet to Life

American Libraries, July-August 1986 | Go to article overview

Folger's Multi-Library Dickinson Exhibit Brings Poet to Life


Folger's multi-libary Dickinson exhibit brings poet to life

"The real drama is in such great work appearing on such small pieces of paper," said Katharine Zadravec, project director of a conference and exhibition celebrating Emily Dickinson as a poet at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. Zadravec wrote the NEH grant proposal for the project.

Entitled "Emily Dickinson: Letter to the World," the amazing array of the poet's letters, manuscripts, and memorabilia ran from May 4 to June 30.

A two-day conference preceding the exhibit brought 250 international visitors to hear presentations on the poet by 17 noted scholars and authors from around the world. Speakers included Yale University's Richard Sewall, who wrote The Life of Emily Dickinson; NYU Professor Jay Leyda, author of the pathfinding study, Years and Hours of Emily Dickinson; and Polly Longsworth, author of Austin and Mabel, the story of the love affair between Emily's brother and the poet's first editor. Misunderstood and ignored for decades, Dickinson (1830-1886) was honored and her work inspected by the assembled devotees who wandered through the Folger. On view were such items as a valentine to her father's law associate, a line she had written on the back of a chocolate wrapper to be reworked later, and a print from a daguerrotype that is the only known photographic image of Dickinson taken in her lifetime.

Zadravec called the event "the first Dickinson exhibit of significance in more than 50 years." According to Director Werner Gundersheimer, the exhibition also marked Folger's first museum show devoted to a woman writer and the first in the Great Hall derived solely from books and objects outside the research library's own collection.

Chief libraries contributing

"Most of the items came from Amherst College's Robert Frost Library, the Houghton Library at Harvard, Boston Public Library, and the Jones Library, the little public library in Amherst, Mass," Zadravec said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Folger's Multi-Library Dickinson Exhibit Brings Poet to Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.