A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the Politics of Memory

By Roberts, Giselle | The Journal of Southern History, November 2015 | Go to article overview

A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the Politics of Memory


Roberts, Giselle, The Journal of Southern History


A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the Politics of Memory. By Jennifer W. Dickey. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2014. Pp. [x], 220. $34.95, ISBN 978-1-55728-657-4.)

The Road to Tara--to borrow the name of Clayton County, Georgia's tribute to its most famous fictional place--has been paved by an incongruent mix of history and popular culture. Add in a few unrealized financial schemes and a dash of preservation controversy, and you have A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the Politics of Memory, Jennifer W. Dickey's intriguing study of the ways that three historical sites in Atlanta have "alternately embraced and shunned" their connection to Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind (1936) (p. 3). Mining correspondence, newspaper accounts, and interviews, Dickey's new book analyzes exhibits at the Atlanta Historical Society (and later the Atlanta History Center) on the book and movie, Clayton County's flirtation with a Gone with the Wind theme park and Tara restoration, and the Margaret Mitchell House's triumph over a wrecking ball, two fires, and a wave of heated public debate.

Dickey begins A Tough Little Patch of History with the backstory: a biographical sketch of Mitchell, the publication of Gone with the Wind, and the adaptation of the book into the 1939 film by David O. Selznick. This work contextualizes the three case studies that follow. The Atlanta Historical Society (AHS), Dickey explains, staged eight Gone with the Wind exhibitions aimed at separating historical fact from cinematic legend. Differentiating the book from the film, and both from Atlanta history, the AHS later added exhibits on the Gone with the Wind industry in an attempt to lure visitors with a glittering array of memorabilia. Clayton County, purportedly the site of Mitchell's fictional plantation, Tara, chased financial dreams that centered on theme parks and historic sites. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the Politics of Memory
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.