Article 4: She Was a Sweetheart: The Sweetheart Symbol and the Formation of Feminist Roots in Campus Culture from 1945 to 1970

By Gorgosz, Jon | American Educational History Journal, Annual 2015 | Go to article overview

Article 4: She Was a Sweetheart: The Sweetheart Symbol and the Formation of Feminist Roots in Campus Culture from 1945 to 1970


Gorgosz, Jon, American Educational History Journal


In 1954, the Aldepheon, the newsletter of Alpha Delta Pi, dedicated three pages to highlight the election of a campus queen from their Alpha Kappa Chapter at the University of Tennessee. The student body at the university had elected a young woman who not only reflected the utmost qualities of a campus beauty but also had a name to match her title. Barbara Queener, affectionately known on campus as "Queenie," was crowned "Miss Tennessee" for the 1954 school year (Anderson 1954, 16 & 19). The article described her as a characteristic "beauty queen" who had the adoration of the campus, saying she had earned "the love and respect of everyone connected with the University of Tennessee" (Anderson 1954, 16 & 19). Her accolades were numerous, including multiple sweetheart and queen titles on campus from the "Tennessee Cherry Blossom Princess" to the "ACE Queen of Hearts" (Anderson 1954, 19). She also adamantly participated in social activities on campus, partaking "on the committees of every campus event," which even included "chairman of the Aloha Oe" (Anderson 1954, 19).

Queenie was the epitome of femininity. She was not only beautiful and popular but also a member of a prestigious sorority. Yet, the Aldelpheon chose to emphasize a number of Queenie's attributes and college achievements that conflicted with conventional notions of femininity during the decades following the Second World War. The article, presumably written by one of her sorority sisters, concentrated on a number of her activities and aspects that were not recognized as tenets of femininity--particularly for campus women. She was an intelligent woman who had the highest scholastic average in the senior class at the university--a 3.93 (Anderson 1954, 16 & 19). Queenie had been a member of both the "freshmen honorary" and "senior honorary" as well as the "Pi Lambda Theta, [the] education honorary" (Anderson 1954, 19). Furthermore, she obtained multiple scholarships and awards for her academic achievements, including the "freshmen faculty scholarship" as well as a number of sorority related honors (Anderson 1954, 19). As a member of the newspaper business staff, student government, and a "Torchbearer"--an award that recognized the eleven most exemplary students at the University of Tennessee--Queenie was much more than a campus woman who only focused on social activities and her aesthetic appearance; she was a dynamic leader at the university holding authority positions within typically male-controlled organizations (Anderson 1954, 19). Remarkably, the Aldelpheon discussed Queenie's vocational pursuits and her life after college. She wanted to be a "good teacher" and be able "to mold [children's] character[s], to develop their minds, and to make them into good citizens" (Anderson 1954, 20). It seemed her future would be more than a husband, a family, and housework.

A year later, in 1955, the Ball State News, the newspaper at Ball State University, documented the election on campus of the "Cherry Blossom Queen," a junior named Barbara Moser. In stark contrast to the description of Queenie in the Aldelpheon, the paper depicted Barbara as a typical coed at Ball State during the middle of the twentieth century. Describing her as "blond" and "blue eyed," the paper emphasized physical characteristics, such as her height, which stood at "five feet, seven inches" tall (Ball State News 1955, 1). The piece detailed her campus involvement, including her sorority affiliation and membership in the "Kallista Art Club" (Ball State News 1955, 1). The article provided very little information to describe Barbara's academic career while at Ball State--besides her class rank--and made no mention of vocational aspirations. It might appear that Barbara never went to class. Her profile aligned with the normative image of campus women--those who joined sororities, partook in campus courtship and placed an importance on their aesthetic appearance--found in both campus and popular culture following World War II. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Article 4: She Was a Sweetheart: The Sweetheart Symbol and the Formation of Feminist Roots in Campus Culture from 1945 to 1970
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.