Joint Dedication: Justice John K. Konenkamp & Professor Jo Pasqualucci

By Gilbertson, David; Zinter, Steven et al. | South Dakota Law Review, Spring 2015 | Go to article overview

Joint Dedication: Justice John K. Konenkamp & Professor Jo Pasqualucci


Gilbertson, David, Zinter, Steven, Miller, Robert A., Meierhenry, Judith K., Kern, Janine M., Vickrey, Barry R., Hutton, Chris, Snyder, Michael, Pommersheim, Frank, South Dakota Law Review


JUSTICE JOHN K. KONENKAMP

JOINT DEDICATION

The Review is honored to jointly dedicate Volume 60 to Justice John K. Konenkamp, who is retiring after twenty years of service on the South Dakota Supreme Court. From all accounts, Justice Konenkamp has been both an essential leader and a significant contributor to the judicial system in South Dakota. Tributes from those who worked most closely with him follow his profile.

Justice Konenkamp was born on October 20, 1944, in Brooklyn, New York. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia in 1967. After serving in the United States Navy, he then attended the University of South Dakota School of Law and obtained his Juris Doctor in 1974. After law school, he practiced as a Deputy State's Attorney in Rapid City, South Dakota and then worked in private practice. In 1984, he was appointed as a Circuit Judge and subsequently became the Presiding Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit. After a decade on the trial bench, he was appointed by Governor Walter Dale Miller to the Supreme Court in 1994. Justice Konenkamp has authored approximately 500 opinions and participated in approximately 2,500 cases as a Justice with the Court.

Devoted to improving the judicial system, Justice Konenkamp is a member of the National Advisory Council of the American Judicature Society, which addresses judicial problems and concerns nationwide. He has also served as co-chair for the South Dakota Equal Justice Commission, was a board member of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee, and was a member of the Advisory Board for the Casey Program.

Justice Konenkamp and his wife, Geri, have two children, Kathryn and Matthew, and six grandchildren. He and his wife are also former foster parents for the Department of Social Services.

In acknowledgement of Justice Konenkamp's faithful service, commitment to the judicial system, and to the legal profession as a whole, the Editorial Board is honored to jointly dedicate Volume 60 to him. Although this dedication serves as only a small tribute, we are honored to recognize such a prestigious individual. Thank you for all your years of service.

DAVID GILBERTSON ([dagger])

Since 1889 only forty-eight persons have been privileged to serve the citizens of South Dakota as a Justice of the South Dakota Supreme Court. None have done it with more distinction that Justice John Konenkamp.

As Justice John Konenkamp closes out a distinguished 30 year career in South Dakota's judicial system, it is my honor to recognize his many and significant contributions, not the least of which is twenty years as a Justice of the South Dakota Supreme Court.

Justice John Konenkamp's judicial opinions are noted for their clarity and insightfulness. In my opinion, this is in part because of the experience he brought to this position. In his early career he was a trial lawyer. He then became a Circuit Judge in the Seventh Judicial Circuit. Thus, his opinions carried a healthy dose of experience and common sense and were not limited to textbook solutions. He authored approximately 500 opinions for the South Dakota Supreme Court. He participated in approximately 2500 cases on our Court.

The portico of the United States Supreme Court proclaims, "Equal Justice Under Law." Justice John Konenkamp not only believed this, he put it into practice. In 2005 he was concerned that not all of our citizens were being able to equally participate in our legal system. He convinced the Supreme Court to create the Equal Justice Commission. He also co-chaired the Commission. Unlike most commissions and boards which require those who appear before them to come to Pierre, he took the Equal Justice Commission to the people to learn first-hand what problems they were incurring in participating in our state's legal system. It held hearings on every Reservation in the State as well as in Pierre and Sioux Falls. …

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