Nazi Bombing Raid on City Remembered 75 Years on; 75 Years Ago, a Nazi Bombing Raid on Cardiff Left 165 People Dead, Many More Wounded and Badly Damaged Llandaff Cathedral. It Was the Worst Attack on Any UK Cathedral, Apart from Coventry. Abbie Wightwick Reports

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), January 4, 2016 | Go to article overview

Nazi Bombing Raid on City Remembered 75 Years on; 75 Years Ago, a Nazi Bombing Raid on Cardiff Left 165 People Dead, Many More Wounded and Badly Damaged Llandaff Cathedral. It Was the Worst Attack on Any UK Cathedral, Apart from Coventry. Abbie Wightwick Reports


Byline: Abbie Wightwick

IT MAY be 75 years ago, but memories of the Nazi bombing raid which killed 165 people in Cardiff and damaged Llandaff Cathedral are still clear.

A vigil of prayer, thanksgiving and reconciliation to mark the anniversary was held at the cathedral yesterday and locals have remembered the night which brought terror to the city.

Dean of Llandaff Gerwyn Capon said the vigil was a chance to remember those who lost their lives and homes, as well as a time to pray for peace and reconciliation to end to all conflicts.

The devastating German raid on the night of January 2, 1941, tore off the cathedral's roof, damaged the landmark spire and caused extensive damage in what turned out to be the most severe WWII attack on any UK cathedral apart from Coventry.

While the cathedral was almost destroyed, no-one on the site was killed as the Dean and the head verger, who had been on fire duty inside it at the time, managed to escape.

But elsewhere in the city that night the blitz killed 165 people, 427 more were wounded and about 350 homes were destroyed.

The 10-hour attack on January 2 was said by the Nazis to be in retaliation for the RAF bombing of Bremen. An armaments factory in Grangetown and Cardiff Docks were prime targets for 100 Nazi pilots.

After the raid, Llandaff Cathedral underwent a major programme of restoration under the architect George Pace, but it was another 17 years, long after the end of war, before the whole building was back in use.

A memorial chapel to the Welch Regiment was constructed and Sir Jacob Epstein commissioned to create the figure of Christ in Majesty which is suspended above the nave on a concrete arch and is now one of the defining sights of the cathedral.

The Queen attended a service celebrating the completion of the restoration in 1960 and the place where the bomb fell, just outside in the grounds of the cathedral, is now a garden of remembrance for those who died that night.

Arthur Impey, 81, was a six-year-old boy living in Victoria Park, Cardiff, at the time and remembers going to see the bomb damage at the cathedral in the days after the attack.

"We little boys went up to have a look and my one clear memory is that the blast had blown out all the windows and we were delighted to see little pieces of lead which had held the glass," he said.

"Quite illegally, we collected bits of this lead which we took home and melted down to make model aeroplanes. That's one of my most vivid memories.

"We were lucky to have one or two toys for Christmas then."

Mr Impey, steward and secretary of the Friends of Llandaff Cathedral, remembers being told the bomb tore graves open, even leaving some skeletons exposed.

"I remember a huge crater," he added. "There was earth and gravestones everywhere.

"At that age it was more of an excitement than thinking how dreadful it was. There were bombing raids.

"I don't remember which was which and which one was the one which damaged the cathedral, but I was never frightened going in the air raid shelter. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Nazi Bombing Raid on City Remembered 75 Years on; 75 Years Ago, a Nazi Bombing Raid on Cardiff Left 165 People Dead, Many More Wounded and Badly Damaged Llandaff Cathedral. It Was the Worst Attack on Any UK Cathedral, Apart from Coventry. Abbie Wightwick Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.