Reintroducing Fuller: Periodical, Transatlantic, Urban

By Bailey, Brigitte | Nineteenth-Century Prose, Fall 2015 | Go to article overview

Reintroducing Fuller: Periodical, Transatlantic, Urban


Bailey, Brigitte, Nineteenth-Century Prose


The current strong interest in Margaret Fuller focuses not only on her identities as a Transcendentalist and feminist but also on her writings as a transatlantic urban intellectual publishing in popular print media. This emphasis, aided by scholarly editions of her journalism for the New-York Tribune, highlights Fuller's presence in the transformative decade of the 1840s, which saw an acceleration in periodical publishing, an intensified exchange of texts across the Atlantic, and an increasingly urban location of writing. Most of the essays in the present issue examine the ways Fuller inhabited transatlantic literary and periodical culture. They also include incisive analyses of her writing in other genres--such as her travel book--and of her development as an urban writer. Framing this new research are retrospective essays by Charles Capper and Bell Gale Chevigny, whose biographical and textual work were major forces in recovering Fuller and, therefore, enabling the ongoing scholarship represented in this special issue.

**********

This collection of new work on Margaret Fuller was prompted by the JL 200th anniversary, in 2010, of her birth. The level of interest in Fuller during her bicentennial year was striking. An academic conference at the Massachusetts Historical Society was well attended and attracted a high level of scholarly participation. The many public events sponsored by the Margaret Fuller Bicentennial Committee, (1) itself organized by Unitarian Universalist women, historical societies, scholars, and others, attracted strong attendances, an enthusiasm I also witnessed as part of a panel on Fuller at the First Parish Church in Concord, Massachusetts. The surge of interest in Fuller in 2010 signaled to me--in addition to interest in Fuller the Transcendentalist and the feminist--that this antebellum figure spoke to our current experience of living in a global, transnational world, a world increasingly routed through cities, and a world whose modes and technologies of communication are rapidly changing.

The efflorescence of Fuller scholarship surrounding her bicentennial caps a sustained period of serious critical and biographical work that has recovered her as one of the most important public intellectuals of the pre-Civil War era. It has also broadened both the scope of research and the methods of interpretation critics have engaged, an interpretive expansion that keeps pace with widening understandings of the scope of Fuller's own critical engagements. Bell Chevigny observes in her contribution to this issue that during the forty-year history of the Fuller revival readers have often found in Fuller an anticipation of their own concerns--about gender, sexuality, social justice, literary theory, and political representation. What the following essays confirm is the emphasis, in much of this new scholarship, on Fuller's participation in a transatlantic and often urban discursive world whose communications issued from the characteristic media of journalism and other periodical publications. This direction of Fuller criticism was not altogether new but received a strong new impetus from the publication, in 1991 and 2000, of scholarly editions of her journalism for the New-York Tribune? Indeed, Fuller's position as a front-page columnist writing on literary, political, and cultural books and events issuing from cities on both sides of the Atlantic highlights the important conjunction of, especially, reform periodicals and public intellectuals in the 1840s. Fuller's journalism may be read together with Lydia Maria Child's writings for the National Anti-Slavery Standard in New York or Heinrich Bornstein's work in Paris for the Vorwarts (2), as authors in this issue demonstrate, or with William and Mary Howitt's work for the People's Journal and Howitt's Journal in London, as Charles Capper has done in his biography (11:296-97, 324).

The critics contributing to this special issue elaborate on the above emphasis--especially Fuller's circulation in a transatlantic world whose lines of communication often ran through periodicals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Reintroducing Fuller: Periodical, Transatlantic, Urban
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.