An Expanding and Shifting Focus in Recent Environmental Health Literature: A Quantitative Bibliometric Study

By Mao, Guozhu; Liu, Xi et al. | Journal of Environmental Health, January-February 2016 | Go to article overview

An Expanding and Shifting Focus in Recent Environmental Health Literature: A Quantitative Bibliometric Study


Mao, Guozhu, Liu, Xi, Du, Huibin, Zuo, Jian, Li, Na, Journal of Environmental Health


Introduction

Novel environmental threats with potentially severe impacts on public health and ecosystems have emerged as a result of rapid growth of the world economy (Iverson & Perrings, 2012). More attention is being paid to environmental health than ever before. The environment used to be considered as "a minor player in the etiology of human illness; in part because only radiation, synthetic chemicals, and industrial by-products were included in the definition of environment (Olden, 2004)." Now, however, extensive studies have been undertaken on environmental health-related issues. These studies can be generally divided into two categories according to the definition of environmental health, i.e., the narrow definition (e.g., air, water, food, and soil pollutants), and the broad definition (e.g., lifestyle factors, occupational exposures, and pollutants) (McGuinn et al., 2012). Indeed, environmental health, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), "... addresses all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person and all the related factors impacting behaviors. It encompasses the assessment and control of those environmental factors that can potentially affect health. Focus should be placed on preventing disease and creating health-supportive environments, which address the relationship between the environment and health (WHO, 2015)."

The biggest threat to human health appears to be adverse environmental changes. McMichael and co-authors (2008) noticed that global environmental changes are unprecedented in scale. Adverse environmental changes may even severely affect global life expectancy, which has increased largely since 1950 as a result of the scientific, social, and technological improvement (Kovats & Butler, 2012). The accurate and detailed relationship between environment and health has drawn an increasing level of attention in all fields, which has led to a surge in the number of related publications. Thus, a timely study is called for to critically evaluate the growing body of knowledge on environmental health. The bibliometric technique offers a useful quantitative and qualitative technique to assess the development and growth of research on the topic of environmental health.

Originally, bibliometric methods had been applied in library and information sciences for citation analysis and content analysis (Henderson, Shurville, & Fernstrom, 2009). In recent years, various characteristics of publications (e.g., author's affiliation, research fields, citation habits, and word distribution) were analyzed to obtain more refined information related to the research itself (Li, Ding, Feng, Wang, & Ho, 2009; Xie, Zhang, & Ho, 2008; Zhang, Wang, Hu, & Ho, 2010).

The aim of our study was to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate environmental health research-related literature between 1993 and 2012, such as the countries' performance, the detailed analysis about the institute, the general trend, and the hotspots. Our findings provide a better understanding of global characteristics of environmental health research, which serves as a useful reference for future endeavors.

Methods

Bibliometric analysis

Bibliometrics is a "statistical method of bibliography counting to evaluate and quantify the growth of literature for a particular subject" (Tsay, 2008)." Bibliometrics uses statistical and mathematical methods to research the distributed architecture, quantitative relation, varying pattern, and quantitative management of the document information and subsequently investigates the structure, characteristics, and patterns of the underlying science and technology. It is worth noting that bibliometrics can address qualitative features despite its quantitative nature (Wallin, 2005). Wallin suggested that bibliometric techniques offer a useful tool to transform intangible quality into a manageable entity and scale from micro (scientist and institute) to macro (national and global) levels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

An Expanding and Shifting Focus in Recent Environmental Health Literature: A Quantitative Bibliometric Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.