Repertoire International De Litterature Musicale (RILM)

By Mackenzie, Barbara Dobbs | Fontes Artis Musicae, October-December 2015 | Go to article overview

Repertoire International De Litterature Musicale (RILM)


Mackenzie, Barbara Dobbs, Fontes Artis Musicae


Overview: RILM was conceived in 1965, established in 1966, and began publishing in 1967.

To coincide with the IAML/IMS 2015 Congress in RILM's hometown of New York City, we are celebrating RILM's 50th anniversary in 2015-16. Celebratory events include a Circle Line boat reception around the island of Manhattan, a special RILM session in honor of the anniversary, and an all-R-Project exhibition at New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

At 50 years young, RILM is healthy and thriving. Its core bibliographic work is solid and continues to expand, and its projects to bring new full-text resources to music researchers are all well underway. Indeed, it is an exciting time for RILM and, by extension, for contributors and users alike.

RILM Abstracts

Database growth

As of 30 June 2015, there were 751,315 published main records in the database and 103,242 published review citations. From 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015, almost 50,000 new main records and 4,500 review records were added.

National committees

The committees have submitted a total of 17,052 bibliographic records (8,672 with abstracts) and 699 reviews--approximately the same number of records as the previous 12month period. Countries that submitted over 1,000 records since 1 July 2014 include China (6,629), Germany (4,245), Russia (1,544), and the U.S. (2,148).

Author submissions

RILM encourages authors to add bibliographic records and abstracts for their publications directly into the database by using the forms at http://rilm.org/submissions/index.html. Through these forms, authors can create new bibliographic citations and add abstracts and reviews to existing records.

In 2014-15, 854 main publication records were submitted by authors, who also added 16 abstracts and 49 reviews to existing RILM records. Authors from the following countries used the submission forms: Germany (107 records); Canada (131); United Kingdom (100); Italy (89); Thailand (83); Poland (66); United States (60); France (48); Spain (27); Brazil (22); Australia (20); Belgium (18). In addition, a handful of authors in each of the following countries used the submission forms: Switzerland; Mexico, Netherlands, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Finland, Serbia, Ireland, Romania, Russia, Turkey, the Vatican, New Zealand, Pakistan, Malaysia, Greece, Hong Kong, Iceland, India, Austria, Algeria, and Chile.

New journals and coverage of music-related articles in non-music journals Since 1 July 2014, RILM began to cover 299 new journal titles: 30 are classified as core; 14 are secondary; 20 are tertiary; and 235 are nonmusic journals.

RILM has always been committed to covering publications on music as broadly as possible. Scholarly articles on music published in non-music journals are a particularly important segment of its database, not least because this material is hard to find for users. We are now making special efforts to expand this coverage area, as the above statistic demonstrates.

Popular music coverage

In the past year RILM has taken steps to further expand its usefulness to popular music scholars. In addition to our ongoing coverage of work published in scholarly journals and monographs on popular music, we are working to advance coverage in other areas. Popular Music Studies is a field defined by its interdisciplinary basis, and thus also an area where much relevant work is published in non-music journals. A new staff member at RILM is focusing her efforts in this very area. Further, at the 2015 national meeting of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, RILM staff took a poll of members' most favored music-centered websites containing unique, substantive writing on popular music genres, scenes, and general criticism. We have begun the process of entering records from some of these online sources.

Finally, another new project initiated in 2015 is the Zines Initiative. …

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