Metacognition and Clay: Visual Reminders of Advanced Thinking

By Smith, Kimberly J. B. | Arts & Activities, February 2016 | Go to article overview

Metacognition and Clay: Visual Reminders of Advanced Thinking


Smith, Kimberly J. B., Arts & Activities


Working in a low socioeconomic public school district means I'm constantly searching for ways to invest students in their learning. My M.Ed. studies at Plymouth State University were in the area of Neurodevelopment and Metacognition; this information has proved vital for my students! We talk daily about ways to overcome self-doubt and ways to give one's self a chance to learn. Introducing metacognition, which means thinking about your thinking, can do this.

You will find the concept of metacognition throughout the new Common Art Standards. The standards tell us that "meta-cognitive activities are crucial to student learning and achievement across the arts and other academic disciplines."

The following projects combine metacognition study with the magic of clay. The result is a memorable artifact about students' new metacognitive tools. Our annual art show is an opportunity for students to share their new learning tools with their family. This is an opportunity for generational learning!

KINDERGARTEN: GROWTH MINDSET LEAVES The concept of Growth Mindset is described in the book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, by Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D. It means that students can and will learn through practice and making mistakes along the way. We encourage students to practice this each and every day! Leaving behind a Fixed Mindset (I tried once, wasn't perfect feet from the start, I give up), they can enjoy their learning journey! Made using a simple leaf tracer W and basic clay tools, each leaf represents growth and is a reminder to practice a growth mindset, which is good for everyone!

GRADE 1: METACOGNITION THINKING CAPS Metacognition means thinking about your thinking. This is important because students need to "own" their learning--actively participate in the process. Being metacognitive means thinking about what you are learning, why you are learning it, how you are learning it and when you will use the information in the future. These thinking caps were fun to make but they are so much more! Learning is not a passive event. Made from an inverted pinch pot and half a strand of Twisteez wire, each thinking cap is a reminder that we want to always encourage students to be active participants in their education.

GRADE 2: GROWTH MINDSET MASKS

Making these masks in second grade was a review of growth mindset and a reminder of the message from . Viktor E. Frankl's book, Man's Search for Meaning. Frankl's training as a psychiatrist and his time in concentration camps led him to an important finding: No matter what happens, each person chooses his or her reaction to events. People go through all manner of bad times, ranging from a skinned knee to much more horrific scenarios. Even so, people choose how to react. Between the event and the reaction is a choice!

We start with a basic intro to Dweck's mindset and Frankl's choice concept. Each student then gets to make a visual representation of the choice to be happy in clay. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Metacognition and Clay: Visual Reminders of Advanced Thinking
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.