Wordsworth Story Will Be Transformed

The Journal (Newcastle, England), February 6, 2016 | Go to article overview

Wordsworth Story Will Be Transformed


THE hamlet where William Wordsworth wrote most of his bestknown work is set for a transformation ahead of the poet's 250th birthday in 2020.

The Wordsworth Trust has secured support for a PS4.75m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to improve the way the Wordsworth story is told in Town End, Grasmere, in the heart of the Lake District.

The Wordsworth Museum's world-class collection will be reinvigorated and expanded, historic buildings will become a hub for visitors and the exploration of themes such as the human mind, democracy and our relationship with nature will bring the Wordsworth story into the 21st Century. Known as the global centre for British Romanticism, Town End is home to Dove Cottage and The Wordsworth Museum, where Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy lived from 1799 to 1808, the period celebrated as his golden decade.

It was during this time that Wordsworth penned his famous line "I wandered lonely as a cloud", inspired by the daffodils he and Dorothy saw on the shores of Ullswater. The majority of his most famous work was written in the cottage and the museum houses an internationally important collection, alongside Dorothy's Grasmere Journals and other work from the Romantic period.

The project will allow more of this collection to go on display and be brought to life with multi-media features and interpretation.

Existing buildings will be sensitively converted into a central visitor centre providing a much-needed place for people to begin their visit.

Other changes to the historic site will ensure that visitors from across the world can enjoy a more memorable experience.

Across the site, larger windows, sympathetic landscaping and greater public access to gardens and woodlands will connect visitors with the landscape which inspired the poet.

The original manuscripts of Wordsworth's poetry will become a key element in involving people in the world of Wordsworth so that they can understand how he worked to perfect thoughts and ideas that are still relevant today. …

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