We Still Have the X Factor; David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson on Reuniting to Play Smash-Hit Sci-Fi Duo Mulder and Scully after a 14-Year Break

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), February 6, 2016 | Go to article overview

We Still Have the X Factor; David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson on Reuniting to Play Smash-Hit Sci-Fi Duo Mulder and Scully after a 14-Year Break


Byline: WORDS RICK FULTON

David Duchovny reckons The X-Files finished on television in 2002 because of the 9/11 New York terror attacks. While believing in UFOs, many fans of the 90s classic thought the show starring David and Gillian Anderson as Fox Mulder and Dana Scully would never make a return to our small screen.

But this week it's back on Channel 5 and has already started its six episode run in America.

Given its love of monsters and government cover-ups it's no wonder The X-Files would return again. Austerity measures, the dark web, drones, illegal wars and refugees are creating a world of unease and fear.

David, 55, said: "When the show was ending back in the early 2000s, it was right after September 11 and I do believe that, even though that's still ripe for conspiracies, I think it was all too real at that point.

"In a way we're back to a time where there's a lot of speculation over world events. People want answers."

And what better show - whose catchphrase was "The Truth is out There" - to ask the questions.

The original show ran from 1993-2002.

In the UK it was first shown on Sky1 on January 26, 1994, going to BBC2 nine months later.

In America 29.1million tuned into watch the Leonard Betts episode in 1997. There were two movies, Fight the Future in 1998 and I Want to Believe in 2008 which co-starred Billy Connolly as a psychic paedophile priest - both films were not as good as they could have been.

Gillian Much of what you watch on television owes its DNA to The X-Files. Shows like from Lost to Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Doctor Who spin-off Torchwood and Bones.

Such was its popularity, a song by Catatonia, Mulder and Scully reached No3 in 1998, there was a Simpsons episode and a comic book which continues today.

Now, 14 years after the ninth season finished in America, creator Chris Carter has managed to get David and Gillian back for series 10. A hard task because, unlike some stars of massive telly shows, they've actually gone on to have big careers.

thought that was David has hits with Californication and Aquarius while Gillian has become a staple of British television in shows like Great Expectations, The Fall, Hannibal and recent period drama War and Peace.

Anderson Finding time for them and other original stars like Mitch Pileggi, who plays FBI Assistant Director Walter Skinner, was helped by the plan of making only six episodes rather than the 22 they used to make.

Gillian, 47, said: "The only way that David and I were able to make it happen was if it was going to be in a short amount of episodes."

The relative failure of second X-Files film, I Want to Believe, in 2008 also helped spur everyone to not let it be the final thing that fans got to see.

Gillian said: "There was a feeling that if the second film was the way that we went out, it wasn't necessarily the right way to go out.

"It would have been nice if there was some kind of closure."

There were also rumours David left before the show finished because he'd fallen out with Gillian and Chris Carter.

He quit in 2001, appearing in just half of series eight and only in the series finale of season nine.

He has gone on record saying he didn't want to ruin the show but wanted it to become a movie franchise and sees Gillian as his "sister" despite the will-they-won't-they suspense of their X-Files characters.

If there were any problems with their relationship, they certainly aren't admitting it at the moment. …

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