Association for Library Collections and Technical Services Annual Report 2014-15

By Page, Mary | Library Resources & Technical Services, October 2015 | Go to article overview

Association for Library Collections and Technical Services Annual Report 2014-15


Page, Mary, Library Resources & Technical Services


The Association for Library Collections and Technical Services, a division of the American Library Association, is the premier organization for professionals in collection development, cataloging and metadata, continuing resources, and preservation. Comprising nearly 3,000 members from the United States and more than forty countries, we lead the development of principles, standards, and best practices for creating, collecting, organizing, delivering, and preserving information resources in all formats.

Accomplishments

Perhaps the most significant event this year was the retirement of Charles Wilt, our beloved executive director, after a seventeen-year career at ALA. It was a bittersweet moment for ALCTS. However, we were very fortunate to hire Keri Cascio as our new executive director. Keri brings a wealth of experience in many different library settings--research, public, consortial--and she has long been active in the association. In fact, she was ALCTS' first Emerging Leader back in 2007, which gives her career thus far a lovely symmetry.

Led by the Planning Committee under chair Meg Mering, we developed a new strategic plan for ALCTS, which was informed by ALA's Strategic Directions. The three-year plan was approved in principle at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. The new plan takes a high-level perspective and does not delve into the operational aspects of our work. Rather, it asks that all activities focus on a few overarching goals: generate awareness of ALCTS and participation in ALCTS activities, improve member recruitment and retention, and achieve financial stability. Committees and Sections will be expected to address how their work addresses these issues in their reports.

The Program Review Task Force, led by Betsy Simpson, was charged to examine ALCTS programming and make recommendations for strategic directions, structural and procedural improvements, and new approaches to meet member needs. The task force submitted its final report to the ALCTS board, and we approved most of its recommendations at the ALA Annual Conference. A key recommendation is to establish a Program Coordinating Group, which will be composed of the leaders (or designees) of the many groups involved in ALCTS programming (e.g., Continuing Education and Program Committees, the interest group coordinator, etc.).

The Fundamentals of Cataloging web course was brought to fruition under the leadership of Vicki Sipe, and it is already a great success. Five sessions of the six-week online course have been scheduled in 2015, and four of those have sold out.

ALCTS 101, held each year at the ALA Annual Conference, is designed to inform new and potential ALCTS members about possible ways to become involved. This past spring, we held a virtual ALCTS 101 program that attracted more than 230 registrants. At the ALA Annual Conference, the in-person ALCTS 101 session drew more than 70 participants, and we inaugurated the first-ever ALCTS 101 After-Party. The Membership Committee and the ALCTS New Member Interest Group (ANMIG) reinvigorated communication with new and renewing members and spearheaded the launch of ALCTSCentral, a general electronic discussion list for all members. …

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