Until You Are Dead Dead Dead: The Hanging of Albert Edwin Batson

By Malka, Adam | The Journal of Southern History, February 2016 | Go to article overview

Until You Are Dead Dead Dead: The Hanging of Albert Edwin Batson


Malka, Adam, The Journal of Southern History


Until You Are Dead Dead Dead: The Hanging of Albert Edwin Batson. By Jim Bradshaw and Danielle Miller. (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2014. Pp. xiv, 235. $30.00, ISBN 978-1-62846-099-5.)

Jim Bradshaw and Danielle Miller have written an engaging account of one young man's capture, trial, and execution in turn-of-the-twentieth-century Louisiana. Albert Edwin "Ed" Batson, an itinerant farmworker who may or may not have committed six homicides near Welsh, a small town in Calcasieu Parish in the southwestern part of the state, went to the gallows on August 14, 1903. It is here, with Batson's hanging, that Bradshaw and Miller both begin and complete their story. In between, the authors reconstruct the ghastly details of the crime scene; the authorities' single-minded focus on Batson, a former hand on one of the victim's farms; Batson's subsequent trial and conviction in April 1902; his successful appeal to the state supreme court on a technicality; Batson's second trial in March 1903, which ultimately confirmed the death sentence of his first; popular opinion about the case in the surrounding areas; and the governor's refusal to listen to his pardon board and commute the sentence to life imprisonment. When, finally, Bradshaw and Miller return to the summertime scene at the gallows, they have raised as many questions about the state's prosecution as the prosecution did about Batson's innocence.

Two juries, a judge, a governor, and much of the area's citizenry believed that Batson deserved to die. Bradshaw and Miller disagree. State testimony, as they see it, neither connected Batson "to the bloody room where the bodies were found stacked one upon another, nor did it establish when the murders took place" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Until You Are Dead Dead Dead: The Hanging of Albert Edwin Batson
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.