Cancer Phobia: The Myths and Realities

By Renaurd, William | Nutrition Health Review, Fall 2014 | Go to article overview

Cancer Phobia: The Myths and Realities


Renaurd, William, Nutrition Health Review


Can you imagine a world without cancer?

If so, you should also visualize scenes of vast economic upheaval among the multitudes who profit from the cancer industry.

Can anyone doubt that cancer has become an industry? Billions of dollars of tax money are poured into the support of the National Cancer Institute and other federal grants for research.

Billions more are lavished upon the American Cancer Society and other approved projects by individual contributors, corporation endowments, and foundations.

After 40 years of such golden flow, the search for a cure remains out of reach. The Cancer Establishment is still pursuing the elusive virus theory and is urging the population to "fight the war on cancer" by trying to detect it in the early stages. Hardly any money is being spent by these organizations to determine methods for avoiding cancer.

The battle cry rallies around the slogan, "Fight cancer with a checkup and a check!"

Are we not, therefore, compelled to pause and wonder? Why should cancer be on the increase? Who is benefiting from the hysteria and cancer phobia that are possessing the population?

The realities are: the business of cancer is better than ever. Expensive machines and equipment are being sold to hospitals and research laboratories. Pharmaceutical laboratories are producing more anti-cancer drugs than ever. The medical profession, as represented by surgeons, radiologists, and chemotherapists, can be considered the recipient of a cancer-windfall of profits.

For all of the multi-billion dollar expenditures, what does the medical establishment profess to know about cancer?

There is no actual evidence that viruses cause cancer in humans, although some viruses are associated with tumor systems.

It is not yet known what causes a normal cell to become a malignant one.

The prevalence of cancer in this country is linked in some way to "man-made" aspects of our civilized environment--with alleged carcinogens abounding in the air we breathe, and the food we eat. Yet how these cancer-causing elements work remains a matter of speculation.

Despite the dramatic announcements (that usually precede a fund-raising drive) heralding "a breakthrough is coming very soon," the public is given few options with which to face the threat of cancer and its devastation.

The dilemma, however, is not without hope. There are individuals within the medical profession and in the unauthorized field of cancer research who contend that the solution to the cure of cancer can be found in the prevention of the disease.

They also say that the answer can be a very simple one and does not require a billion dollar super-structure.

They key importance of nutrition in preventing and curing cancer provokes considerable controversy and is too often ignored by those who have the funds and the responsibility to provide sponsored research.

Dr. Ernst L. Wynder, President of the American Health Foundation in New York, reported to a convention of cancer researchers:

"There is increasing evidence that nutrition plays an important role among the environmental factors which are linked with cancer development. …

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