In California, Hope for Student Mental Health Care: Outreach Results in Greater Student Service Engagement, Higher Grad Rates

By Botelho, Stefanie | University Business, February 2016 | Go to article overview

In California, Hope for Student Mental Health Care: Outreach Results in Greater Student Service Engagement, Higher Grad Rates


Botelho, Stefanie, University Business


California's colleges and universities have made strides in providing mental health care to students--when higher ed as a whole has struggled to keep up with a growing demand for services. Recent studies suggest that up to one-third of college students suffer mental health problems.

California's Mental Health Act, passed in 2004, assesses a 1 percent tax on residents whose personal income exceeds $1 million a year, providing an annual $8 million toward mental health care and early intervention measures for public colleges and universities.

A Rand Corporation analysis found student use of mental health services increased 13 percent in fiscal year 2013-14, and an additional 329 students graduated as a result of receiving these services. A 2009 University of Michigan student survey linked depression to lower GPAs and a greater risk of dropping out.

In the California State University System, the grant funded extensive mental healthcare training for administrators, faculty and students. Sessions focused on suicide intervention skills, mental health first aid, and the "question, persuade and refer" (QPR) model of communicating with distressed students, says Ray Murillo, the system's director of student programs.

QPR trains staff to recognize and respond accordingly when a student is demonstrating suicidal behavior.

Those who attended the CSU sessions also became certified to provide ongoing suicide prevention and mental health training on their home campus, he says.

Mental health awareness activities takes many forms, including:

* Campuswide health and wellness fairs

* Awareness efforts to eradicate stigma associated with mental health disorders

* Peer-to-peer programs in which students act as mentors for their classmates

* Student organizations such as Active Minds, a group working on several California campuses to promote mental wellness events

* Classroom presentations by counseling and psychological services staff

CSU offers commuter students depression screenings at campus health centers and mental health links in student portals, Murillo says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

In California, Hope for Student Mental Health Care: Outreach Results in Greater Student Service Engagement, Higher Grad Rates
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.