Unfussy Fescue

By Hoang, Lauren Dunec; McCausland, Jim | Sunset, March 2016 | Go to article overview

Unfussy Fescue


Hoang, Lauren Dunec, McCausland, Jim, Sunset


"Very simple, very dramatic": That's how the owners describe the grass that carpets their Menlo Park, California, front yard. Passersby love its wind-tossed-sea effect; in fact, someone knocks on the door every couple of months asking for the name of the grass. Called Eco-Lawn, it's a blend of a half-dozen fescues (planted from seed) that grow well in sun and shade, never get much above ankle height, and take on this wavelike look when left unshorn. The lawn gets mowed just once or twice a year--to eliminate seed heads--and needs only occasional watering, design: Sherry Johnson and Linda King, Olive & Fig Garden Design, Woodside, CA; oliveandfiggarden.com.

"This grass makes sense for the dry West because it's deep-rooted and unthirsty."

JOHANNA SILVER, SENIOR GARDEN EDITOR

PLANT

To attract pollinators to your garden, set out colorful, drought-tolerant perennials such as autumn sage (Salvia greggii), bush poppy (Dendromeeon harfordii), California wild lilac (Ceanothus), and flannel bush (Fremontodendron).

Start seeds of carrot, lettuce, potato, and spinach directly in beds. But wait until nighttime temperatures stay above 55[degrees] to plant seedlings for cucumbers, green beans, melons, tomatoes, and zucchini.

Sow seeds of cosmos, marigolds, and zinnias directly into amended garden beds. …

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