Cosmos Uchenna Nwokeafor. (Ed.). 2015. Information Communication Technology (ICT) Integration to Educational Curricula: A New Direction for Africa

By Amoah-Boampong, Cyrelene | African Studies Quarterly, December 2015 | Go to article overview

Cosmos Uchenna Nwokeafor. (Ed.). 2015. Information Communication Technology (ICT) Integration to Educational Curricula: A New Direction for Africa


Amoah-Boampong, Cyrelene, African Studies Quarterly


Cosmos Uchenna Nwokeafor. (ed.). 2015. Information Communication Technology (ICT) Integration to Educational Curricula: A New Direction for Africa. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, Inc. 272 pp.

Cosmos Uchenna Nwokeafor's Information Communication Technology (ICT) Integration to Educational Curricula examines the role that information communication technologies (ICTs) could play in altering the academic curricula in African educational institutions, if appropriately integrated and efficiently utilized. This fifteen-chapter volume also demonstrates how the integration of ICTs impact future instructional materials and content delivery at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of African education. Issues ranging from the use of the World Wide Web and social media to the utilization of smart classroom are well documented and discussed to emphasize the centrality of ICTs in the metamorphosis of Africa's educational curricula.

Volumes of this nature are timely because within the past decade ICTs have become an essential part of the fabric of society especially in the developed world. However, with the exception of South Africa the rest of the African continent has consistently lagged behind in the ICT revolution. Thus, Nwokeafor's book is very welcome, as an ICT driven social and economic development in Africa is urgently needed. Indeed, Nwokeafor's chapter "The Role of ICT in Changing Academic Curricula: A Review of the Educational System and Integration Approach in Schools in Africa" is a broad survey of various African governments from Tunisia through Ghana to Kenya that have seen the need for improved ICT and have set up frameworks guiding the establishment and continued integration of ICT to the country's educational system. These nations acknowledge that ICTs are rapidly disseminating globally and any nation that is not equipped with appropriate technologies and the skills to utilize these technologies will permanently lag behind in global development. Furthermore, African nations recognized that the infusion of ICTs in their educational structures could aid in elevating the level of educational outcome as well as facilitate a paradigm shift from traditional learning strategies of rote learning and regurgitation of information to a collaborative and student centered delivery method. …

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