Alice Cooper: The Rock Singer on Discovering Rock 'N' Roll, His New Recording of Peter and the Wolf, and How Classical Music Has Influenced His Own Work

Gramophone, February 2016 | Go to article overview

Alice Cooper: The Rock Singer on Discovering Rock 'N' Roll, His New Recording of Peter and the Wolf, and How Classical Music Has Influenced His Own Work


As a child I didn't hear any classical music. My dad was a fan of big band music. He liked Frank Sinatra and Jimmy Dorsey. I absolutely loved that music too.

Then Elvis came along. I was six or seven years old at the time. One day my uncle, who played guitar, came over to our house and put on this record. It was Chuck Berry. My uncle played along with it and I thought it was the coolest thing ever. So that was my introduction to music. From that point on, rock'n'roll was really my music.

My dad was a preacher but he could tell you who played electric bass for The Animals or who played electric guitar in The Yardbirds. He would listen to The Beatles and The Rolling Stones and say, 'This is really good!' He wasn't one of those guys who said, 'This is the devil's music'.

My first experience of classical music was at junior high school. Everybody had to study the classics--Bach, Beethoven, Brahms and Chopin. Then I met my wife, who was a classical ballerina. She was completely steeped in classical music and ballet so I'd hear a lot of classical music around the house because she was always practising and rehearsing.

You know, Bach, Beethoven and Brahms were the rock stars of their day. They were pretty crazy! They probably did things that were considered oudandish by a lot of their fellow musicians. At the time they were probably considered really avant-garde. But we don't see them like that these days.

There have always been strong operatic elements in my songs. Bob Ezrin, who produced many of my most successful albums, and who also worked with Lou Reed, Pink Floyd and a number of other artists, was classically trained. He added a classical touch to the theatrical ideas I had. My songs had rock-based chord structures but Bob taught us to think classically. He added these classical touches and turned our songs into something different. I liked that. I liked the idea that those things could collide and create something new and refreshing. Great composers will hear something and store it up somewhere in the back of their minds. Then when they're composing, suddenly that line will be in there again, but they won't remember where it came from. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Alice Cooper: The Rock Singer on Discovering Rock 'N' Roll, His New Recording of Peter and the Wolf, and How Classical Music Has Influenced His Own Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.