Smart Phones Changed Our Lives; BYTE ME

The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia), March 12, 2016 | Go to article overview

Smart Phones Changed Our Lives; BYTE ME


Byline: with BRUCE kERR

TODAY'S article will look at a device that has become so popular and so sought after that most people believe they can't ever live without one - the smart phone. How technology can drive trends is nothing short of viral and the evidence is everywhere you walk, especially if you visit a mall in Brisbane or a railway station or airport terminal.

Such is the fascination with smart phones that we have people sometimes walking into each other or worse, walking into cars or even trains! We even see crowds queueing overnight to get the first released phones of a new model. Many people will be familiar with the capabilities of these devices; however a quick rundown of their many uses as well as some handy hints could prove helpful.

Let's start with the obvious category of use which is that of making or receiving a phone call and again we will concentrate on the more modern crop of smart phones - ones released in the last year or two. The benefits of a smart phone over a standard mobile phone are many. In this category we have the added features of being able to split your contacts into groups and the ability to assign a particular ring tone and or picture to many of your most common contacts.

With a smart phone you have the ability to see who is calling if they are in your contacts as well as being able to conference a call or reject a call with a text message. You can also call direct to a business or phone number that you have just searched for on the web and add directly to your contacts. Other very standard features are simple things like adding the last dialled or received numbers to your contacts list.

When it comes to SMS messages (texting) smart phones add the ability to send combined content messages such as text with pictures or web links. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Smart Phones Changed Our Lives; BYTE ME
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.