Guest Editorials; Florida Kids Receiving Poor Health Care

The Florida Times Union, March 22, 2016 | Go to article overview

Guest Editorials; Florida Kids Receiving Poor Health Care


Excerpts from an editorial in The Ocala Star-Banner:

More than 5,000 pediatricians and pediatric specialists have been asked whether they participate in Florida'sMedicaid managed-care program, what the wait times are for Medicaid patients, and whether the managed-care companies create barriers to care for young patients.

The survey follows an eye-opening series by the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, "2 Million Kids. $24 Billion Battle," which found that the state's privatized Medicaid program is "largely ineffective."

Part of the problem, the Herald-Tribune noted, "is a dearth of data available to indicate how pediatricians navigate the massive state and federal health program that cares for more than 2 million children" - about half of Florida's entire under-20 population.

The hope is that the survey will provide state officials and the Legislature with independently gathered and analyzed data they can use to improve the effectiveness of the state's $24 billion Medicaid program.

Georgetown University researchers will conduct an in-depth study of all available data to provide a snapshot of the Florida Medicaid program for children in 2016, and how the program compares with those of other states.

Florida's program has a long way to go.

Our comments: Active oversight is essential in making sure Florida's children receive good health care.

U.S. LAGS ON ECONOMIC FREEDOM

Excerpts from an editorial in the The Orange County (Cal.) Register:

A "solid C," they call it in school. That grade characterizes the score of 75.4 that the United States earned on the Heritage Foundation's 2016 "Index of Economic Freedom," which grades countries on such factors as property rights, government spending, business freedom, monetary freedom and taxation.

The rankings closely correlate with economic growth. At the head of the class, as usual, was Hong Kong (88.6).

America's score ranked it 11th, just behind the United Kingdom (76.4) and Estonia (77.2). Canada is in sixth place.

At the bottom were the two remaining communist countries. In 177th place was Castroite Cuba (29.8), and rock bottom, 178th place, was erratic dictator Kim Jong Un's North Korea (2.3).

In 2007, the U.S. stood in fourth place, with a score of 82. Barack Obama became president in 2009, and his policies largely are to blame for this decline, according to Heritage.

But we would add that President George W. Bush was in the White House when the Great Recession hit in 2007-08. And Republicans have controlled the House of Representatives for more than five years since the 2010 Tea Party rebellion against too much government.

Our comments: The dismal scores and the blame on both parties helps to explain this political season of discontent on the election trail. America shouldn't be trailing any nation in economic freedom.

GOOD NEWS ON SMART JUSTICE

Excerpts from an editorial in The Miami Heral

We commend Gov. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Guest Editorials; Florida Kids Receiving Poor Health Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.