An Organizational Learning Model: Gain a Competitive Edge by Aligning Corporate Learning and Strategy

By Lebredo, Nick | Strategic Finance, March 2016 | Go to article overview

An Organizational Learning Model: Gain a Competitive Edge by Aligning Corporate Learning and Strategy


Lebredo, Nick, Strategic Finance


Many companies strive to continuously develop human capital and maximize employee performance potential. The ever-changing business environment requires an ongoing commitment to learning and constant adaptation to new demands. In Learning to Succeed, Jason Wingard provides useful direction for developing and implementing an integrated training model for C-suite executives, human resource professionals, and all levels of management.

Drawing on his doctorate in education as well as his experience as chief learning officer at Goldman Sachs, Wingard offers keen insights and practical advice about how to better align organizational learning with corporate strategy via his Continuous Integration of Learning and Strategy (CILS) model.

Successful implementation of CILS depends on a programming framework that consists of three foundational pillars: thought leadership that introduces new knowledge to the organization based on research or best practices; development programs that tailor learning opportunities to specifically targeted groups; and advisory services that conduct training needs assessments as well as individual coaching and consulting.

A chapter of the book is dedicated to addressing four common barriers to change: leadership, culture, employees, and resources.

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Leadership might resist CILS because of limited resources and because tangible benefits might be difficult to recognize. …

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