Whipping Up Fervourpeople, It Emerged That Very Few Animals; ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS

Daily Mail (London), April 8, 2016 | Go to article overview

Whipping Up Fervourpeople, It Emerged That Very Few Animals; ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS


Byline: Compiled by Charles Legge

QUESTION Were there any Biblical origins to the practice of self-flagellation that became so popular in medieval times?

SELF-FLAGELLATION refers to the beating of one's own skin (usually on the back, and often drawing blood) as a bodily penance to show remorse for sin.

Flagellation is still acted out for symbolic purposes during penitential processions during Lent's Holy Week in Mediterranean countries. In this context, it's a physical reminder that Jesus Christ was scourged and mocked as he dragged his cross along the road to Calvary and his crucifixion.

In the Philippines, penitents enact an extreme form of this whereby they are whipped until blood is drawn and then stage mock crucifixions.

Self-flagellation came to prominence in Western Europe around 600 to 800 AD as an extreme version of bodily penance. It was during the Black Death (1348).

The Biblical basis for purging sin through self-flagellation and other mortifications of the flesh could be two verses from St Paul, 1 Corinthians 9:27: 'No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize,' and Colossians 1:24: 'Now I rejoice in what I am suffering for you, and I fill up in my flesh what is still lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church.'

These verses have led to Paul being seen, in some quarters at least, as the model for the Christian ascetic tradition.

M. S. Jacobs, London NW4.

QUESTION Is American shock-jock Michael Savage still barred from entering the UK?

MICHAEL SAVAGE is an unusual character, a doctor of botany who has written several books under his real name, Michael A. Weiner, and a very outspoken anti-liberal talk show host.

As Weiner, he has published books such as Earth Medicine -- Earth Food: Plant Remedies, Drugs And Natural Foods Of The North American Indians; Nutrition Against Ageing; and Secrets Of Fijian Medicine. In his talk show host persona, he has written The Savage Nation: Saving America From The Liberal Assault On Our Borders, Language And Culture; and Liberalism Is A Mental Disorder.

He's best known for his nationally syndicated talk show The Savage Nation, broadcast by KSFO in San Francisco million listeners.

In 2009, then Home Secretary Jacqui Smith banned Savage from the UK for 'seeking to provoke others to serious criminal acts and fostering hatred which might lead to inter-community violence'.

Others banned included various Islamic hate preachers, former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard Stephen Donald Black and neo-Nazi Erich Gliebe.

The Coalition government announced in 2011 it would lift the ban only if Savage took back statements he had made on his broadcasts that were deemed a 'threat to national security'. He refused and the ban was re-confirmed by the Home Office.

Savage was furious: 'How about democracy in the UK?' he said. 'The freedom to a trial? The freedom of appeal? The freedom to set the record straight?

'Why does the Cameron government protect Muslim terrorists and Muslim hatepreachers who espouse the overthrow of the British government, democracy itself, while banning Michael Savage from entering the land of their better forefathers?'

Savage claimed that his name had been 'plucked out of a hat' because he was 'controversial and white'.

Writing in the Washington Times, Jeffrey T. Kuhner said of the ban: 'Radical Islam has won a major victory in its war with the West. This triumph did not take place on the battlefield.

'A bomb was not detonated. …

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